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Deposition Designation Station

Articles on Electrical - Electrocution

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Imagine for a moment that you are sitting in your home, listening to the rain while reading your favorite novel. Then suddenly you hear a roar of thunder and your home becomes dark. What just happened? You may have just experienced a power surge. Although lightning is not the most common cause of this phenomenon, it is excellent for illustrating what a power surge is and how it can affect your home. A power surge is a term used to describe a condition where the voltage and or current increases beyond its normal levels. Power surges, when due to the elevation of the voltage being supplied by the electrical utility company, have the potential to change data streams, interrupt electrical control circuits, burn out components, cause arcs, create shorts between conductors, overload systems, and cause system failures. The most common causes of power surges are indicated as follows:

Is it possible to differentiate between lightning related surges and artificially generated electrical surges?

Ideas are stored in the human mind as a neural pattern. These same ideas can be stored in a computer through an organization of memory bits. In both cases the memory is electrical in nature. Ideas are transferred between people by converting the information in memory to electrical impulses that operate our vocal cords or the fingers on our computer keyboard.

Abstract — Severe weather events such as ice and tropical storms routinely cause extensive damage to electrical distribution systems. Much of the damage and service loss can be attributed to trees. Events where service restoration spans days or weeks are generally closely examined through regulator directed hearings. Even when no specific actions are subsequently

Abstract - For power transmission systems compliant with safety codes and reliability standards there remains a risk of tree-caused interruptions from the in-fall of trees from outside the right-of-way. This paper reports on the quantification of tree exposure outside National Grid’s transmission corridors and examines the variables impacting the risk of a line contact by trees