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Articles on OSHA

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8/18/2016 · OSHA
Electricity is a vital source of energy in our daily lives. It powers tools, provides light and heat. Our working lives are much improved and efficiency greatly increased thanks to electricity. But what about those situations where power from the grid is unavailable. Well, portable generators are an excellent tool for such a scenario.

6/24/2016 · OSHA
Safety culture is a term frequently bandied about in today's business world and sounds as trendy as "mission statements" were years ago. (Let's not forget "best in class". First time I heard this at a company meeting I looked around to make sure I hadn't mistakenly wandered into a dog show. Really?)

4/11/2016 · OSHA
In the safety world hazard recognition plays a vital role in keeping your people safe from unsafe behaviors and/or conditions. Some hazards are easily recognized, for example an employee climbing up a 20 foot ladder with tools held in both hands. (This is a fall hazard by the way.) Common sense right? The safety guy who taught me safety had a great response to this attitude, "Few people have any sense (read knowledge) in common (read shared alike)". So while some safety hazards are immediately recognizable others require training to spot and avoid. Training is a key method in avoiding the "Ostrich Zone". One such hazard is Hydrogen Sulfide. You don't want to bury your head facing this hazard. (Won't do much good anyway, Hydrogen Sulfide is heavier then air!)

3/7/2016 · OSHA
"If you don't know where you are going, you will probably end up somewhere else.", so said Laurence J. Peter, a professor at the University of Southern California whose works touched the business world. (He is well known for the "Peter Principal".) Peter's above quote essentially points out that action lacking a clear objective will likely lead to unwanted or unintended consequences.

2/19/2016 · OSHA
Hazard recognition plays a vital role in keeping employees safe. Some hazards are easily recognized, for example an employee climbing up a 20-ft ladder while holding tools in both hands is an obvious fall hazard. While some safety hazards are immediately recognizable, others require training to spot and avoid. One such hazard is hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Training is a key method to avoid the "ostrich zone." You do not want to bury your head when facing this hazard.

1/29/2016 · OSHA
When personal injury events occur legal negligence actions may arise. Common law negligence is established by plaintiff showing defendant owed plaintiff a legal duty, to conform to a standard of care, defendant breached that duty, plaintiff suffered injury and there is a causal relationship between the breach and injury. FN 1 But what sources of standard of care proofs are available? How does a litigant go about proving standard of care?

3/24/2015 · OSHA
Every year, approximately 3,600 workers are permanently disabled, and on average, one worker per day is killed, as a result of electrical incidents in the workplace.* To prevent these types of electrical injuries and deaths, building owners and managers should apply the safeguards included in NFPA 70E, the standard utilized by the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) for building electrical assessments. OSHA utilizes the National Fire Protection Association's (NFPA) 70E Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace to provide improved safety procedures for workers through proper warning labels, restricted access notification, personnel training and personal protective equipment (PPE). OSHA compliance will minimize workplace injuries, accidents, illnesses, equipment damage, production losses, and legal costs, which are all avoidable and unnecessary factors in any business.

3/13/2015 · OSHA
Case Synopsis: The Plaintiff was diagnosed with mesothelioma. The Plaintiff alleged he was exposed to asbestos from boilers at his high school gym, a private school, where the Defendants supplied the boilers and did the plumbing and heating work. The basis of the Plaintiff s claim is that he alleged he was exposed to dust in the gym. There was no evidence that the dust in the gym contained asbestos fibers and there is no proof that Defendant handled asbestos and certainly no proof that they introduced asbestos into the alleged construction dust. The boilers were located in the basement, in a separate room, and were there during the 1967-68 construction work.

1/2/2010 · OSHA
The plaintiff's estate, filed lawsuit for the death of a company official that was killed from a fall when the stairs collapsed in a building he was walking through to observe existing asbestos containing materials, in preparation to complete a bid.

1/2/2010 · OSHA
Analysis of a case where the plaintiff, an engineer doing boiler flue stack gas sampling/analyzing, ran backwards as he was winding up his plastic tubing and fell into an open storm water ditch that received hot water from a boiler continuous blow down line.

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