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Attorneys: Intellectual Property Consultants

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Antonio R. Sarabia II
3463 Tanglewood Lane
Rolling Hills Estates CA 90274
USA
phone: 310-377-5171
fax: 310-377-5039
APPAREL: During his 25 years of experience, Mr. Sarabia has become intimately familiar with the many business problems - and legal issues - which fashion companies may face. The start of his apparel industry experience was nine remarkable years as part of the senior management of Guess?, Inc. Guess? went through amazing growth during this period, one year alone its sales grew 400%! In these nine years, Guess? transformed from a fad into a mainstay fashion company. Those who were fortunate enough to work there saw a variety of challenges, problems and issues which most apparel companies do not encounter over decades. This incredible environment immersed Mr. Sarabia into a wide array of apparel business matters including apparel designs, design creation, design protection, brand establishment and protection, advertising, domestic and foreign manufacturing, factory monitoring, quality control, export, import, customs issues, product sourcing, corporate structure, apparel company management, including officer and director obligations and performance, domestic and foreign distribution, licensing, trade secrets, personnel, independent sales representatives, retail sales, retail custom
Litigators often reach for doctrines such as res judicata or collateral estoppel to narrow the scope of a case. Res judicata prevents re-litigation of the same claim that was litigated in a prior case. Collateral estoppel prevents re-litigation of the same issue that was decided in a prior case.

EIGHT YEARS AGO Congress decided that the existing means for awarding damages for trademark infringement were not deterring this illegal practice and decided to supplement these measures with statutory damages-a specific range that a court could award even in the absence of proof of a plaintiff's losses or the defendant's profits.

In the last 10 years, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has decided two cases involving naked licensing: Barcamerica International v. Tyfield Importers (9th Cir. 2002) 289 F.3d 589, and Freecyclesunnyvale v. The Freecycle Network (9th Cir. 2010) 626 F.3d 509.

Eight years ago Congress decided that the existing measures of damages for trademark infringement were not deterring trademark infringement. It decided to supplement these measures with statutory damages - a specific range of damages which a court could award even in the absence of proof about plaintiff's losses or defendant's profits.

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Michael Nranian, JD, MBA, MS
10945 Stoney Point
South Lyon MI 48178
USA
phone: 248-376-0338 or 248-446-4052
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Michael Nranian, JD, MBA, MS has over 30 years experience focusing in Product Development, Intellectual Property, Patent Litigation, Legal and Technical Compliance, and Product Liability Litigation. He is a licensed attorney in Michigan, Texas, & the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Mr. Nranian is a Six Sigma Black Belt, Professional Engineer, & Certified Project Management Professional. He has an in-depth background and education in Law, IP, Electrical, Chemical & Computer Engineering, & Business. He has testified extensively as an expert witness in depositions, hearings, and trials in state & federal courts.

Mr. Nranian conducts Product and Technology Analysis, Patentability & Prior Art Research,and provides Technology & Litigation Support for Intellectual Property. His litigation background includes patent infringement / non-infringement under literal infringement and the doctrine of equivalents, patent validity / invalidity, prior art, & file-wrapper estoppel, for both ITC and Federal cases, including Inter Partes reviews. He conducts analysis of patents and products, prepares claim charts, & expert witness reports. This includes testimony and document preparation for cases before state, and federal court jurisdictions, and the International Trade Commission and the Patent Trial and Appeal Board.

Mr. Nranian is thoroughly familiar with all 101, 102, 103, 112, and other enablement and prior art arguments. His experience includes Technology Standards Boards and Licensing Authorities, Antitrust / DOJ, Technology Development and Transfer, Patents, Trademarks, Trade Secrets, and Copyrights, Licensing, Unfair Competition/Trade, False/Deceptive Advertising, & Lanham Act Actions, & Class Actions.

His Product Liability Expert Witness litigation background includes all types of Safety Systems, Electrical Systems, Fires, Accident Reconstruction, and Evaluation of Alternative Designs for Automotive, Medical and other industries. He has over 29 years of experience in Automotive Safety Systems, Sensors, Seatbelts, Airbags / Curtains, Seats, Diagnostic Systems, Crash Recorders, Crash Pulse Analysis, System Diagnostic, Fault Codes, Structure (including roof-crush and door) and front, side & roll-over systems (including sensing and algorithm development) for domestic and international corporations. He is thoroughly familiar with all regulatory (including FMVSS), and corporate due-care requirements, & preemption arguments, occupant kinematics, & injury causation.
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Douglas W. Dal Cielo
1503 Grant Road
Mountain View CA 94040-3270
USA
phone: 650-327-2672
fax: 650-688-8333
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Doug Dal Cielo Legal Malpractice Expert PhotoDouglas W. Dal Cielo, partner at the prestigious firm of Burke, Williams & Sorensen, LLP, specializes in general Business Litigation, Real Estate, and Family Law.

Mr. Dal Cielo was admitted to the State Bar of California in 1991. He is a Member of California State Bar Association, the Sacramento County Bar Association, and the Santa Clara County Bar Association. He is qualified to appear in the United States District Courts for Central, Eastern, Northern, and Southern California.

Mr. Dal Cielo possesses significant trial experience, including eight jury trials and over 12 court trials. His last two jury trials resulted in verdicts for his clients in excess of $12M and $2M on behalf of plaintiffs. He has taken over 300 depositions, and served as a court appointed arbitrator and mediator.

Mr. Dal Cielo's recent accomplishments include a $12 million jury verdict for his client in Santa Clara County, a $2 million jury verdict for his client in Sacramento County, and representation of several families in a CC&R claim in Santa Cruz County (see case studies as part of the attached CV for more detail). He has also testified as an expert in numerous jury and court trials, as well as binding arbitrations on the issue of the standard of care in legal malpractice cases.

Areas of Practice:
  • Antitrust Counseling
  • Banking, Private Financing Techniques
  • Business Dissolution
  • Business Start-up and Structural Organization
  • Commercial Leasing and Development
  • Contract Disputes
  • Contract Preparation, Negotiation, Administration
  • Copyright and Trademark Infringement
  • Franchising
  • General Corporate Counseling
  • Employment Litigation
  • Insurance
  • Medical Devices
  • Mergers, Acquisitions, Divestitures
  • Products Liability
  • Public Contracts
  • Public Financing
  • Real Property Development
  • SEC Matters
  • Secured Transactions and Foreclosure
  • Structuring Joint Ventures
  • Trade Secret Theft
  • Marital Dissolution
  • Elder Abuse
  • View Douglas W. Dal Cielo's Expert Witness Profile.
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    Darryl Horowitt, Esq.
    Partner & Chair Litigation Department
    499 West Shaw Avenue,Suite 116
    Fresno CA 93704
    USA
    phone: 559-248-4820
    fax: 559-248-4830
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    Coleman & Horowitt, LLP is a Civil Litigation and Transactions Firm. It provides a wide variety of services to businesses and individuals through its two departments. By concentrating in these areas, members of the firm have become exceptionally proficient in dealing with all phases of preventive law, litigation, alternative dispute resolution and the negotiation and preparation of documentation to meet the needs of today's businesses. The firm has a varied client base ranging from small family operations to large, publicly traded corporations.

    Darryl Horowitt, Esq.Darryl Horowitt, Esq. has conducted all phases of litigation in the areas of Banking, Business Disputes, Securities Fraud (class action and individual), Construction, Real Estate, Environmental, Casualty Insurance Defense, Personal Injury and Commercial Collections, from initial client contact to settlement, mediation, arbitration and trial - court and jury (State and Federal Court) and administrative proceedings (before the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Agriculture, National Labor Relations Board, California Department of Fair Housing and Employment, Worker's Compensation Appeals Board and Agricultural Labor Relations Board).

    Mr. Horowitt has also assisted in transactions, including incorporation, purchase and sale agreements, secured and unsecured transactions, and employment contracts. In the field of alternative dispute resolution, he has served as an arbitrator (for the American Arbitration Association, NASD Regulation, Inc., Better Business Bureau Dispute Resolution Center, and the Fresno and Madera County Superior Courts), mediator (privately and for the Better Business Bureau Dispute Resolution Center), special master (for Judge James Ware, United States District Court, Northern District of California) and judge pro tem (Fresno County Courts).

    Firm's Areas of Practice Include
  • Banking
  • Commercial Real Estate
  • Business
  • Casualty Insurance Defense
  • Construction Litigation and Transactions
  • Insurance Coverage
  • Environmental Law
  • Commercial Collections
  • Personal Injury Litigation
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution (mediation, arbitration and mini-trials)
  • Estate / Tax Planning
  • As the owner of a business that may be a party to a lawsuit, you need to know about the discovery of electronically stored information (ESI), also known as e-discovery. Why? Because the requirements to preserve and produce ESI are quickly evolving and have often taken over lawsuits as if e-discovery has a life of its own. This article will address the basics of e-discovery so that your business can start taking steps to minimize its impact.

    2/10/2016 · Insurance
    In a previous issue of Legal Brief, I discussed protecting yourself with adequate auto insurance. This is, perhaps, the insurance that is most commonly bought, because every driver is required to be covered by automobile liability insurance. But what about business owners? Should they buy insurance as well?

    11/20/2015 · Legal Issues
    Every day, in almost every city, and in almost every state, a business is served with a subpena. Your business may have received one in the past or may receive one soon. For those who are not regular participants in lawsuits, subpoenas are a mysterious document which you should know about.

    10/1/2015 · Finance
    It is an unfortunate fact of business that from time to time one of your customers will not pay for goods or services you provide. It is a frustrating and sometimes helpless feeling that you have knowing that even though you provided a valuable product or service, for reasons beyond your control you are simply not paid. How do you collect your money? What follows are some techniques that will help you effectively collect your receivables.

    Litigation in our court system has become an expensive, time-consuming, and frus trating process which often yields undesired results. Nevertheless, a trial may be necessary to vindicate certain fundamental rights. For many disputes, however, there are alternatives to trial. This article addresses some of the alternatives, known collectively as "Alternative Dispute Resolution ('ADR')," and their potential benefit.

    Because of the increase in cost of litigation, and the more frequent use of arbitration clauses in all forms of contracts, arbitration is used with increasing frequency. Although arbitration is an excellent choice in many instances, it may not be right in every case. This article will discuss the pros and cons of arbitration so that you may know whether it is right for you.

    10/14/2014 · Forgery & Fraud
    Identity theft should be a concern to all because of its pervasiveness. One form of theft is the opening of a credit card account using a pre-approved credit card solicitation. You may have received one or more of these solicitations every day, if not every week. Sometimes, the same company will send more than one such solicitation. The credit card companies do this because they receive information from credit reporting agencies and those with acceptable credit scores are sent more attractive offers.

    7/25/2014 · Legal Issues
    Many consumer lawyers have argued that the failure to disclose a deferred down payment constitutes a Rees-Levering violation even if the amount of the down payment is accurately stated. An issue did, however, exist as to whether or not the inadvertent exclusion of a deferred down payment on the line for a down payment constitutes a Rees-Levering violation. This question has been answered by the court in Rojas v. Platinum Auto Group, Inc. (January 15, 2013) 212 Cal.App.4th 997.

    4/19/2012 · Banking
    Virtually everyone and every business has a relationship with a financial institution, whether it be a bank, savings bank, or credit union. When the account is opened, there is the hope that nothing will go wrong in the account and that your funds will be preserved.

    For many, the idea of owning your own business and being your own boss is alluring: you set your hours and you alone reap the rewards of your endeavors. Unfortunately, the road to success is often paved with many perils: employee costs continue to spiral as do the cost of goods; increased competition from other companies both here and abroad; more regulation from local, state and federal agencies; etc.

    11/17/2011 · Laws & Procedures
    On virtually any day of the week, you can pick up a newspaper and read about a lawsuit. You read the article and say to yourself: "There but for the grace of God go I." Then, the seemingly inevitable happens: You receive a letter from an attorney (or their client) that you are to be sued, or worse, you are served with a lawsuit.

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    Prof. J. Gregory Sidak
    1717 K Street, NW
    Washington DC 20006
    USA
    phone: 202-518-5121
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    Gregory Sidak Antitrust Economics ExpertJ. Gregory Sidak is an Expert Economist in the fields of Damages, Antitrust, Patent, Telecommunications, Regulation, Commercial and Investment Arbitration, and Intellectual Property Law. His firm, Criterion Economics, L.L.C., offers market research and analysis, and preparation of reports and white paper services to support legal disputes. Prof. Sidak has been a consultant on regulatory and antitrust matters to the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice and the Canadian Competition Bureau and to multinational corporations in the telecommunications, electric power, natural gas, mail and parcel delivery, broadcasting, newspaper publishing, and computer software industries in the Americas, Europe, Australia, and Asia. The focus of his research has been Regulation of Network Industries, Antitrust Policy, the Internet and Electronic Commerce, Intellectual Property, and Constitutional Law issues concerning Economic Regulation.

    Prof. Sidak has led seminars and research on damages and irreparable harm. He formerly served as Deputy General Counsel of the Federal Communications Commission and as Senior Counsel and Economist to the Council of Economic Advisers in the Executive Office of the President. Prof. Sidak is the founding editor of the Journal of Competition Law & Economics for the Oxford University Press. His writings have been cited by the Supreme Court of the United States, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, and lower state supreme courts. He has also been cited by the Supreme Court of Canada, the European Commission, the Federal Trade Commission, and other regulatory agencies.

    Consulting Services: Damages and Valuation with expertise in disputes related to Trade Secret, Trademark, Trade Dress, Copyright Infringement & False Advertising, Licensing (Know-How) and Patents. Prof. Sidak's Consulting Services are usually sought out for Technology Disputes, Claims of Monopolization Antitrust & Unfair Competition, Administrative Proceedings, Price-Fixing & Dominance Allegations, Trade & Distribution Agreements, and to provide Regulatory Advice.

    View Expert Witness Profile.
    6/17/2015 · Telecommunication
    Regulators in many countries have asserted that setting asymmetric mobile termination rates (MTRs) between the incumbent mobile telephony operator and its smaller rivals is an efficacious means by which to help entrants attain efficient scale. We investigate empirically the efficacy of this policy experiment using data from a global sample of 34 countries from 1996 through 2014. We estimate a model that relates operators' long-run market shares to initial entry conditions and the degree of asymmetry among MTRs using an instrumental variables (IV) strategy. The estimates imply that a high degree of asymmetry among MTRs lowers an entrant's long-run market share by roughly 4 percentage points compared with a regime of symmetric MTRs, and the effect is roughly constant across market penetration levels. Furthermore, mobile operators tend to perform better when entering markets with higher levels of concentration and lower levels of market penetration. Our novel findings cast doubt on the efficacy of imposing asymmetric MTRs as a means to achieve greater equality of competitive outcomes. Our findings inform the larger body of theoretical literature on the pricing of interconnection and network access.

    5/18/2015 · Patents
    Under what conditions may the holder of standard-essential patents (SEPs) seek to enjoin an infringing implementer without breaching the SEP holder's contract with the standard-setting organization (SSO) to provide access to those SEPs on fair, reasonable, and nondiscriminatory (FRAND) terms? I show that the SEP holder's contractual obligations still permit it to seek an injunction. A FRAND commitment requires the SEP holder to offer a license for the SEPs on FRAND terms (or otherwise to grant implementers access to the SEPs). Extending an offer containing a price within the FRAND range discharges the SEP holder's contractual obligation.

    4/17/2015 · Telecommunication
    In 2005, Ofcom, then telecommunications regulator in the United Kingdom, implemented functional separation of British Telecom plc (BT), separating its wholesale and retail services. BT established a division within the company, Openreach, to provide equal access to its local access network and backhaul products. The tenth anniversary of this regulatory and corporate experiment is an appropriate moment to ask whether functionally separating Openreach from BT benefited consumers. We find that Openreach's creation generated short-run consumer benefits in the form of lower prices but also led to negative long-run effects, which outweighed the short-term price reduction.

    3/18/2015 · Insurance
    Google distributes proprietary applications for its open-source Android mobile operating system (OS) free of charge. Some of those applications (apps) are offered together as a suite of apps known as Google Mobile Services (GMS). Manufacturers of mobile devices can agree, pursuant to Google's Mobile Application Distribution Agreement (MADA), to install the suite of apps on their devices at a price of zero. Some theorize that Google's policy of offering some applications together as a suite of apps harms competitors or menaces consumer welfare.

    2/10/2015 · Patents
    Mark Lemley and Carl Shapiro propose that standard-setting organizations (SSOs) mandate that their members henceforth submit to binding, final-offer arbitration (commonly called "baseball arbitration") to set fair, reasonable, and nondiscriminatory (FRAND) royalties in licensing disputes concerning standard-essential patents (SEPs). SSOs should reject this proposal. It does not rest on sufficient facts or data, nor does it apply intellectually rigorous principles and methods of law and economics in a reliable manner. This is not to say that the voluntary use of arbitration to resolve FRAND licensing disputes is inherently problematic. However, the incremental efficiency that Lemley and Shapiro claim that their proposal would achieve over litigation or conventional commercial arbitration is illusory. For one, it is much harder to value a portfolio of SEPs over the span of five years than to value an individual baseball player for a single season.

    1/8/2015 · Patents
    What does it mean for a patent holder to commit to a standard-setting organization (SSO) to license its standard-essential patents (SEPs) on fair, reasonable, and nondiscriminatory (FRAND) terms? When is a royalty FRAND? Drawing from both legal theory and economic theory, I propose an interpretation of FRAND that distinguishes and reconciles the conflicting definitions of FRANDand provides courts a practical approach to identifying FRAND royalties

    12/4/2014 · Economics
    Complex civil litigation routinely includes expert economic testimony. However, determining which expert economist is more credible may confound a lay jury. It may even confound the judge when ruling on the admissibility of expert economic testimony during the Daubert hearing.1 One solution rarely employed is for the court to appoint its own neutral economic expert under Rule 706 of the Federal Rules of Evidence2 when a lawsuit contains a claim for damages that will require rigorous analysis of data. Based on my recent experience as Judge Richard Posner's court-appointed neutral economic expert on damages in patent infringement litigation, I explain in this article how the wider use of Rule 706 would assist the judge and jury and would facilitate the prompt settlement of intellectual property, antitrust, securities, contract, business tort, and other complex disputes.3 The benefits to courts and litigants would surely exceed the costs.

    9/23/2014 · Telecommunication
    As part of the Modification of Final Judgment (MFJ) that implemented the divestiture of the Bell operating companies (BOCs) from AT&T on January 1, 1984, the BOCs were forbidden to carry telephone calls from one local access and transport area LATA) to another. Although the Telecommunications Act of 1996 superseded the MFJ, it retained the BOCs' interLATA prohibition and established, in section 271, a process – involving each state public utilities commission, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), and the Department of Justice (DOJ), acting on a state-by-state basis – by which the BOCs could earn regulatory approval to enter the interLATA market within the regions in which they provide local exchange service. As of September 1, 2002, the BOCs had received section 271 authorizations to provide in-region interLATA service in fifteen states.

    8/19/2014 · Antitrust
    A recent phenomenon in competition policy is the acquisition of a private firm by an enterprise that is either wholly owned by government or in the midst of privatization. Such an acquisition poses the question of how public ownership may alter the incentives of a firm to engage in anticompetitive conduct. It also prompts one to examine the process by which such altered incentives revert, as the level of government ownership declines, to the same incentives that face purely private firms. Using Deutsche Telekom's acquisition of VoiceStream Wireless as a case study, this article presents the economic questions relevant to evaluating the competitive consequences of acquisitions by partially privatized firms. It predicts gains or losses to various constituencies of producer groups.

    7/15/2014 · Antitrust
    In this review of John Lott's book, Are Predatory Commitments Credible?: Who Should the Courts Believe?, we find that Lott is more successful in pointing out the likelihood of predatory pricing by public enterprises than in proving that predatory pricing by private enterprises does not occur. In Part I of this Review, we critique Lott's theoretical and empirical attempts to show that predatory pricing by private firms is implausible.

    6/6/2014 · Economics
    Mail delivery is one of the few economic activities that has avoided the wave of deregulation and privatization that has swept network industries over the last few decades. This Article examines several questions regarding the business activities of Canada Post Corporation in a competitive environment. What should be the appropriate mandate of Canada Post? If Canada Post is a natural monopoly, what form of regulation best serves Canadian consumers? If Canada Post's delivery of letter mail is not a natural monopoly, what basis exists for retaining Canada Post's current statutory monopoly? What potential exists for Canada Post to abuse its statutory monopoly-and other statutory privileges and immunities-to compete unfairly against efficient private suppliers of postal services?

    5/1/2014 · Economics
    Few phrases in public policy have become so overused so quickly as the information highway. Although it is unclear to many what that superhighway is or will be, this uncertainty has not prevented proposals to regulate the superhighway from being made. In this Article, we examine the economic principles that should govern competition and regulatory policies concerning the development and operation of the information superhighway.

    3/28/2014 · Antitrust
    Since 1975, when the debate over monopolistic predation began to boil in courts and universities, most discussion has focused on predatory pricing. And although the allegation of predatory innovation arose in some well-known litigation involving Kodak and IBM, lawyers and economists have produced little credible work explaining how this phenomenon can occur, let alone how it should be identified and remedied if deemed to threaten consumer welfare.

    2/19/2014 · Antitrust
    Antitrust law currently lacks a unified theory of liability and damages. But the Supreme Court's recent acceptance of consumer welfare as the goal of antitrust law underscores a growing judicial inclination to construe antitrust liability rules to encourage efficient production and efficient resource allocation. As the Court reconstructs the law of antitrust liability, it should also revise the law of antitrust damages by defining the rights created by those damage measures to accomplish specific economic goals.

    1/21/2014 · Antitrust
    A routine defensive tactic of targets of hostile tender offers is to seek a preliminary injunction under section 16 of the Clayton Act on the ground that the offeror's acquisition of the target's stock would effect a merger violating section 7 of the Act. The litigation costs that an antitrust injunction imposes on an offeror seems unlikely to exceed the offeror's risk-adjusted expected benefit from the takeover. In this Article, I discuss several reasons why the possibility of delay tendes to discourage a potential offeror from ever making a tender offer.

    12/13/2013 · Antitrust
    Through its antitrust enforcement system, society allocates resources to deter anticompetitive behavior. Antitrust enforcement is costly because prosecutors and judges mischaracterize some competitive or efficiency-enhancing behavior as horizontal collusion. In this early application of the Polinsky-Shavell argument about the tradeoff between the probability and magnitude of fines, this essay argues that, given prosecutorial and judicial error, society will not optimally allocate its antitrust enforcement resources by threatening price fixers with exorbitant economic penalties that have only a minimal probability of being enforced.

    11/11/2013 · Antitrust
    Current controversies over patent policy place standard-setting organizations (SSOs) on a collision course with antitrust law. Recent theoretical research conjectures that, in an SSO, patent owners can "hold up" patent users in the sense of demanding high royalties for a patented input after the SSO has adopted the patented technology as an industry standard and manufacturers within the SSO have incurred sunk costs to design end products that incorporate that standard.

    9/23/2013 · Antitrust
    We examine the consumer-welfare implications of Google's project to scan a large proportion of the world's books into digital form and to make these works accessible to consumers through Google Book Search (GBS). In response to a class action alleging copyright infringement, Google has agreed to a settlement with the plaintiffs, which include the Authors Guild and the Association of American Publishers.

    8/19/2013 · Antitrust
    We favor revision of the Horizontal Merger Guidelines.1 Our preliminary comments in this essay are based on a work in progress that we provisionally entitle, "Favoring Dynamic Competition over Static Competition."

    7/31/2013 · Antitrust
    Competition authorities in foreign jurisdictions have recently adopted or are considering guidelines on applying competition law to intellectual property rights (IPR). A common concern that certain exercises of IPR can restrict competition underlies IPR provisions that would enable competition authorities to compel holders of IPR to license their IP at regulated royalties.

    7/16/2013 · Antitrust
    The OECD's proposed regime of asymmetric ex ante regulation for Mexico's telecommunications marketplace would reduce competition, contrary to the OECD's aims. The OECD's proposals would harm Mexican consumers and force an increase in prices paid for telecommunications services. They would create a government-sanctioned price cartel among the telecommunications providers.

    6/24/2013 · Antitrust
    A recent phenomenon in competition policy is the acquisition of a private firm by an enterprise that is either wholly owned by government or in the midst of privatization.

    6/5/2013 · Antitrust
    agencies in the United States and the European Union began investigating Google's search practices in 2010. Google's critics have consisted mainly of its competitors, particularly Microsoft, Yelp, TripAdvisor, and other search engines.

    5/6/2013 · Antitrust
    The landmark Microsoft case raises challenging questions concerning antitrust remedies. In this Article, we propose a framework for assessing the costs and benefits of different remedies, particularly divestiture, in monopolization cases involving network industries.

    4/2/2013 · Antitrust
    What is the proper legal standard for product integration involving software? Because software is subject to low marginal costs, network effects, and rapid technological innovation, the Supreme Court's existing antitrust rules on tying arrangements, which evolved from industries not possessing such characteristics, are inappropriate.

    2/28/2013 · Antitrust
    A “price squeeze,” or “margin squeeze,” is a theory of antitrust liability under section 2 of the Sherman Act that concerns a vertically integrated monopolist that sells its upstream bottleneck input to firms that compete with the monopolist’s production of a downstream product sold to end users.

    The Telecommunications Act of 1996 sets forth extensive provisions to unbundle the local telecommunications network to encourage the development of a competitive market for local telephone.

    10/22/2012 · Antitrust
    The September 2009 announcement that the Federal Trade Commission and the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice have initiated a review of the Horizontal Merger Guidelines provides a formal process for redefining the proper role of dynamic competition in antitrust law.

    J. Gregory Sidak, Dan Maldoom, Richard A.D. Marsden, Hal J. Singer
    The Brussels Round Table, a forum of leading EU telecommunications operators and equipment manufacturers, commissioned these articles. They examine the deployment of broadband in European countries and make policy recommendations related to telecommunications regulation. Specific topics include pricing flexibility, competition, growth potential, likely future dynamics, competition, investment opportunities, eliminating excess regulation, facilitating longer-term points of view, and suggestions for transparent and competition-neutral subsidies.
    J. Gregory Sidak
    This book addresses deregulatory policies that threaten to reduce or destroy the value of private property in network industries without any accompanying payment of just compensation, policies that are termed "deregulatory takings." The authors further consider the problem of renegotiation of the regulatory contract, which changes the terms and conditions of operation of utility companies.
    J. Gregory Sidak
    Restrictions on foreign investment in U.S. telecommunications firms have harmed the interests of American consumers and investors, argues J. Gregory Sidak in this convincing study. Sidak shows why these restrictions, originally intended to protect America from the perils of wireless telegraphy by foreign agents, should be repealed...