banner ad

Special Education Expert Witnesses

Sort Non-Featured Profiles by
Check for SynapsUs
Allan S. Billehus, LPC, CRC
3585 Raymond Drive
Atlanta GA USA
phone: 404-735-6900
Allan Billehus Vocational Rehabilitation Expert PhotoAllan Billehus, Ed.S., M.S., CRC, LPC, is an experienced Forensic Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor. He has been a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) since 1996 and a Licensed Professional Counselor in the state of Georgia since 1999.

Mr. Billehus has worked with and performed a variety of psychological and vocational assessments on over 3,000 individuals. He has performed over 250 vocational evaluations, most of which were commissioned by the Georgia Department of Vocational Rehabilitation. He has completed over 400 comprehensive psychological evaluations on individuals applying for or already enrolled in the Developmental Disability Medicaid Waiver programs. Mr. Billehus has testified in over 1,000 Social Security Administrations ODAR Federal court in Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, South Carolina, and Arizona.

Litigation Support - Mr. Billehus provides litigation support services to counsel representing both Plaintiff and Defendant. He performs forensic evaluations of severely disabled persons for Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, Products Liability, Age and Sex Discrimination, Wrongful Termination, Long Term Disability, Divorce, and Workers Compensation. He has vast experience working with paraplegics (SCI), quadriplegics, brain damaged babies, traumatic brain injuries (TBI), blindness, burn victims, and amputees.

Mr. Billehus is also familiar with the use of DOT, COJ, OOH, HAJ as well as Transferable Skills Analysis (pre and post injury), Earning Capacity Evaluation, and Labor Market Surveys. Vocational Evaluations performed include IQ, Achievement, Personality, motor skills / dexterity, work samples, and interests. He has also performed professional contracts in workers’ compensation, long-term disability, SSDI, SSI, Developmental Disability sheltered workshops and centers, private/public schools, hospitals, private companies, and state vocational services.

Areas of Expertise:
  • Vocational Evaluations
  • WOIA-IDEA Transition Planning
  • Disability Evaluation
  • Loss of Earnings Capacity
  • TDIU Evaluation
  • Veterans Disability
  • Loss of Employment
  • Forensic Mental Health Evaluation
  • LTD Evaluation
  • PTSD
  • Psychological Disability Evaluation
  • Vocational Assessments
  • Job Placement Services
  • Medical Case Management
  • Vocational Case Management
  • View Allan Billehus' Consulting Profile.
    4/27/2016 · Family Issues
    There are more people separated from the workforce now than there has ever been in the United States. Many of these individuals are not in the workforce by choice, although they will give you a list of issues and reasons why they are not working. As the need for information supporting requests for Alimony and Child Support increases, so does the need for assessment of earning capacity and vocational potential. Determining a spouse's earning ability can pose a difficult and complex dilemma. A spouse may be out of work by mutual agreement, e.g., health reasons or raising children, or may be unemployed involuntarily, e.g., job change or downsizing. A spouse may be purposely out of work or underemployed, or hiding income and this is when imputed income is needed. When issues arise regarding support of the spouse or children, determining the earning capacity for which either spouse should be responsible becomes a critical issue.

    3/25/2016 · Damages
    Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors specialize in the study of medical and psychological aspects of disability, assessing an individual's disability to delineate functional limitations and possible vocational alternatives. This unique and specialized knowledge places vocational rehabilitation counselors in a critical forensic role as an expert witness for the tire of fact. The vocational expert (VE) assessment and testimony measures the scope and severity of a disability in functional and vocational limitations. This is vital in accidents that occurred and may be subject to legal claims for monetary damages.

    2/15/2016 · Disability
    Veterans Disability can be very frustrating and a long process. Medical & Psychological issues are challenging for claims people, attorneys and judges alike to assess in vocational & functional terms. If there is conflicting information, what are the implications, how will it be addressed? It is the purview of the Vocational Expert to address vocational limitations and abilities based on medical and psychological limitations.

    Check for SynapsUs
    Dr. Gilbert W. Kliman
    2105 Divisadero Street
    San Francisco CA 94115
    phone: 415-292-7119
    fax: 415-749-2802
    Children's Psychological Health Center, Inc. - Our mission is to bring the highest quality of child, adolescent and adult psychiatric expertise to difficult civil litigation issues concerning children.

    Practice Specialties - Nationwide forensic child psychiatry, evaluation and testimony in over 225 civil cases involving claims of institutional neglect, psychological trauma, loss of parental services, abuse, often with multiple victims.

    Areas of Expertise:
    • Child Psychiatry
    • Forensic Psychiatry Evaluations, Reports and Testimony Concerning Psychological Issues such as Trauma
    • Institutional Negligence (schools, academies and residential treatment centers - particularly concerning allegations of abuse
    • Wrongful Death: Loss of Parental Services
    • Allegations of Child Abuse - whether individual or multiple children, family or institutional, we conduct objective evaluations or such complaints and assess the damages stemming from complaints we find confirmed by forensic studies
    • Mental Health in Disasters (earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, firestorms, tsunamis and wars
    • Children in Foster Care
    Gilbert W. Kliman, M.D. - Harvard Medical School

    Licensure and Board Certification
    • Fellow and Diplomat of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
    • Distinguished Life Fellow
    • American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
    • Certified in Psychoanalysis for Adults, Children and Adolescents by the American Psychoanalytic Association and the New York Psychoanalytic Institute
    Dr. Kliman won the International Literary Prize for Best Book concerning the Well Being and Nurture of Children, "Responsible Parenthood" and is the recipient of grants from over 50 private foundations and The National Institute of Mental Health.

    His research interests include the Psychological Trauma and Treatment of Severely Disturbed Children and their families, in-classroom psychotherapy.
    4/17/2013 · Psychiatry
    Preventive psychiatry is a branch of preventive or public health medicine. It aims to promote good mental health in individuals and to prevent the occurrence or reduce the incidence of psychiatric disease in a population.

    3/8/2012 · Psychiatry
    Here you will meet several children helped by Cornerstone who suffered from tragic losses and tragic circumstances. This chapter is essentially practical in its orientation to technique, describing several forms of treatment of bereaved children, with a minimum of theoretical essay. Probably the best definition of "mourning" for our current purposes is, "the totality of reaction to the loss of a loved object."

    11/19/2011 · Psychiatry
    Monroe was the kind of child from whom usually little is expected therapeutically. A member of a disadvantaged ethnic minority, he lived in the poverty of a big-city slum ghetto...

    9/27/2011 · Psychiatry
    The legal system and juries customarily weigh evidence more regularly than the psychoanalytic profession.

    Check for SynapsUs
    Independent Forensic and Clinical Psychiatrist
    307 West Minnehaha Parkway
    Minneapolis MN 55419
    phone: 612-275-7385
    William R. Dikel, MD, is a board certified Adult, Adolescent, and Child Psychiatrist with over 30 years experience providing expertise to professionals in all of the systems that serve individuals who have mental health disorders.

    Dr. Dikel is an Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN. He served as a Past President of the Minnesota Psychiatric Society and the MN Society of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. He is a distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association.

    Litigation Support - Dr. Dikel works with defense and plaintiff's attorneys in civil and criminal justice cases, and provides consultation and expert witness services to professionals and clients in the Education, Insurance, Public Health, Social Services, Corrections and Mental Health systems. Dr. Dikel is skilled in communicating complex psychiatric issues to laypersons, and this skill has proven to be very useful in consultations with attorneys and in deposition and courtroom testimony. Dr. Dikel has provided over 25 years of psychiatric care to severely mentally ill clients in community mental health clinics.

    Areas of Expertise:
    • Forensic Psychiatry
    • Personal Injury
    • Psychiatric Diagnosis Clarification
    • Mental Health File Reviews
    • Disability / Insurance Claims
    • School Mental Health
    • Independent Educational Evaluations (IEEs)
    • Special Education Responsibilities
    • Educational Due Process Hearings
    • Management / Organizational Consultation
    • Psychopharmacology
    • Workman's Compensation
    • Diminished Capacity / Competency
  • Reduced Responsibility
  • Child Protection Psychiatric Assessments
  • Workplace Violence / Harassment
  • Competency Assessments
  • Defamation Lawsuits
  • Insanity Defense
  • Employee Psychiatric Risk Assessment
  • Malpractice Issues
  • Standards of Care
  • Institutional Negligence
  • Neurological Damage
  • Employee Assistance Programs
  • Contested Wills
  • View Dr. Dikel's Consulting Profile.
    William R. Dikel, MD
    From anxiety and depression to ADHD, autism spectrum disorders, behavior disorders, substance use disorders, and psychoses, this practical book provides essential information on how mental health disorders are diagnosed and treated, how they tend to manifest at school, and how they affect students’ emotions, behaviors, and ability to learn. It explains why traditional behavioral interventions are often unsuccessful, and describes effective classroom interventions that teachers can use to provide optimal educational experiences.
    Check for SynapsUs
    Edward F. Dragan, Ed.D.
    Principal Consultant
    49 Coryell Street
    Lambertville NJ 08530
    phone: 609-397-8989
    fax: 609-397-1999
    Professional consultation for schools, attorneys and individuals. Court-qualified education administration, liability, school review and special education expert. More than 30 years experience in education. National practice.

    DOCTORATE: Rutgers University - Education Administration.

    MASTERS: College of NJ - Special Education.

    MASTERS: Franklin Pierce Law Center - Education Law.

    LAWYERS - Document review. Case analysis, development and litigation support. Expert reports. Deposition and trial testimony. School evaluations and comparisons for matrimonial issues.

    SCHOOLS - Liability and management assessments. Policy review and recommendations. Program review and development. Special seminars.
    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any education program, including in colleges and universities, if those programs or activities associated with the institution receive federal funding. Under Title IX, sex discrimination includes sexual harassment, sexual battery, sexual assault, rape and other sexual violence at school, college or university campuses. Any behavior that disrupts a student's access to an educational opportunity or benefit constitutes a violation of Title IX. Recent media coverage has brought to light the controversy over the six-month sentence for a former Stanford University student for the rape of a student on campus. There has been outrage over the sentence, and that outrage might be justified, given schools' responsibilities in similar cases.

    Some of our most vulnerable children are relegated to a life away from parents, family, and their school to live where other adults take the place of their parents and are responsible for their custody or care - legally defined as in loco parentis. This occurs when children are placed in residential centers for the treatment of mental illness, schools for the deaf and blind, or similar facilities for children who require extensive medical care and management.

    Nationwide, 7.6 million students participate in interscholastic athletics, according to U.S. News and World Report. Keeping them safe is critically important to avoid school liability and sports injury lawsuits. And when sports injury occurs, schools may be found responsible if they failed to take reasonable precautions and supervision of students in order to prevent sports injury. Parents send their children to school with the implicit expectation that schools will do whatever is necessary to keep them safe whether in the classroom or on the football field.

    As difficult as it might be to accept and understand, abuse of children is occurring at an alarming rate in our nation's schools, daycare centers, camps, and other institutions. Even with state laws that require child abuse reporting and institutional policies that address sexual abuse prevention, identification, and reporting, abuse is not going away. More civil lawsuits are filed with each passing year, and schools and other organizations are not always appropriately responding to this epidemic.

    In the wake of recent incidences of gun violence, school safety and security has become an increasingly pressing concern in the United States and Canada. Schools, summer camps, daycare centers, and other agencies charged with the safety of children have a duty to protect them, and their ability to do so depends on solid policies, training, and appropriate response to security threats. Laws, regulations, and internal policies designed to shield children from harm may be developed proactively in response to a risk assessment or reactively in response to an event that caused injury to a child. Both are valid options in today's climate of terroristic threats to school safety and security. Inaction is not. Schools and other child-centered programs must consider and develop appropriate responses to this new dynamic.

    Risk of personal injury to children is reduced when activities, facilities, equipment, personnel, and supervision are brought into compliance with "standards." There are several sources of standards. Some standards are mandated by law through statutes. Additional standards are set forth by oversight authorities, such as the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Camping Association, the National Federation of High School Athletic Associations, or the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, to name a few. Other standards involve the customary professional practice of those conducting such activities. Ignorance of such standards is no excuse for failing to comply and schools and agencies with children have a duty to be proactive about implementing standards in order to prevent student injury.

    Many school-aged children have medical conditions about which teachers, nurses, and others who are responsible for their health, safety, and well-being should know. If not addressed in the right way by administrators, teachers, or other officials, these conditions can result in a catastrophic incident, not to mention costly litigation. A student with a known heart defect, for instance, is vulnerable in a physical education class if the teacher is not informed of the child's condition and does not institute appropriate precautions or prepared to respond in a medical emergency. If cafeteria personnel in a daycare center know that a child has a peanut allergy but fail to supervise the child appropriately, the child can go into shock if she is allowed to sit at a table where another student is eating peanut butter. In situations like these, if a plan for the child's care was either not in place or developed but not communicated to the staff, the child might suffer irreparable harm - or even die.

    In my profession as an education administration and student supervision expert, I have observed that residential schools and boarding schools present a higher duty than day schools to supervise children and a greater opportunity for the school to be found liable for child abuse and injury. When children are living and learning in a program 24/7, staff must demonstrate not only a professional standard of care, but also a reasonable and prudent parent standard of care. Although related, these standards are distinct and must be appropriately and reasonably applied in a setting where staff serves as surrogate parents and others serve as teachers, counselors, and psychologists. When a child is sexually assaulted, administered unnecessary corporal punishment, or is injured or dies in a residential school, both of these standards need to be addressed.

    The first responsibility of educators and those who supervise children in residential programs, day care centers, before- and after-school programs, and other settings is to make sure that these programs foster learning and care in a safe environment. Asking third graders to move a cart with a heavy TV on top, inadequate staff instruction in safe techniques to quell disruptive students, not carefully checking that the door to the pool closes and locks the way it is supposed to, excessive discipline, playground aides talking among themselves but failing to pay attention to the children, not providing a sufficient number of nighttime supervisors in a dormitory, and a school police officer not trained on how to interact with children with behavioral disorders - any of these circumstances can lead to student injury at school or death of a child and high litigation costs. The overriding professional standard of care is to protect children's health, safety, and well-being. Under this umbrella fall the development and implementation of policies, adequate staff training, and a level of supervision reasonably calculated to keep children safe.

    7/7/2015 · Child Welfare
    In settings where children are supervised by adults, we often think about traditional settings, such as schools and summer camps. But these are not the only places where children participate in activities that require adult supervision and which can result in child injury cases. Some nontraditional settings include resort and vacation day care programs, community recreation centers, church-sponsored events, and Boy and Girl Scout activities, among others.

    For schools, summer camps, and day care centers, one of the key functions of student supervision is to identify dangerous conditions and then either stop the activity or warn of the danger. The supervisor must take appropriate action for the protection of the children. Duty to warn contemplates both having knowledge of danger (actual or constructive notice) and having time to communicate it. Field trip injuries are very common and there is an equal duty to protect when children are off campus but still under school supervision, such as when children are on a school-sponsored trip. Excursions off school property present special challenges. Careful planning ahead of the trip, knowing about potential safety hazards, and creating a plan to avoid or mitigate them can help to protect a child from field trip injuries and a school from liability lawsuits.

    Keeping children safe in schools, preschool and daycare programs, summer camps, on playgrounds, and other locations is a primary responsibility of those who administer such programs. When a child becomes injured and the claim is negligent supervision, a school or other agency will have a greater chance of prevailing when it has clear policies and enforces them. In school premises liability lawsuits plaintiffs are more likely to prevail when a facility fails to maintain its campus and equipment, does not have a regular inspection plan, and does not instruct and supervise students in the safe and appropriate use of equipment.

    Employment decisions in public and private schools should be based on qualifications, performance, merit, and seniority, rather than race, national origin, gender, religion, age, or disability. Teachers and other school personnel can sue for employment discrimination if they are wrongfully dismissed or demoted, if they were prevented from initially obtaining a job, or not appropriately accommodated for a disability or medical condition. Most employment discrimination violates either state or federal law, and legal protections are found in the 14th Amendment to the Constitution and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Additionally, two primary federal statutes prohibit disability discrimination in employment: the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990.

    2/6/2015 · Child Welfare
    When child abuse is alleged to have taken place in a school, daycare facility, preschool program, summer camp, or other entity responsible for the supervision and safety of children, there is always the possibility that the entity may be liable if negligence can be established. Schools and other entities with a duty to protect children often become embroiled in lawsuits alleging that breach of this duty was a proximate cause of a child's injuries. Though laws vary, states adopt a broad definition of child abuse, including physical and emotional abuse, neglect and abandonment, incest, sexual molestation, and sexual exploitation. Typically, a child abuse report must be made to a designated state agency responsible for child protective services when a person, in his or her official capacity, suspects or has reason to believe that a child has been abused or neglected, or knows that a child has been subjected to conditions that could reasonably be expected to result in harm.

    School coaches have a duty to protect athletes from harm, including emotional or physical harm that may result from locker room hazing. High school hazing in athletics has many beginnings - the most prominent being an attitude of superiority among senior athletes and the belief that a weaker or younger athlete must be subjected to harassment to "make the grade" or to be "good enough" to be on the team. This mentality, if left unchecked and if students are allowed to participate in hazing behaviors, eventually can result in even more serious misconduct, such as sexual harassment and serious personal injury.

    When a student personal injury in a public school triggers litigation, plaintiff and defendant attorneys must address the concept of governmental immunity. In general, governmental immunity shields public schools from tort litigation and liability. Governmental immunity is not universally applicable, however, depending on how the facts of a specific case accord with state or provincial laws. This article is about how governmental immunity in public school cases might be pierced and how schools can determine whether governmental immunity applies in school liability cases.

    Millions of children participate in programs operated by daycare centers, nursery schools, and camps across the United States and Canada. The most important aspect of childcare is the safety and supervision of children. When a teacher, recreation leader, camp counselor, or other supervisor is engaged in activities involving young children, there is a duty to protect the child from physical harm, sexual abuse, and other forms of personal injury. A breach of duty to protect the health, safety, and welfare of a child that leads to injury may result in daycare negligence lawsuits.

    In 2011, the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (OCR) issued a "Dear Colleague" letter to college and university administrators about implementation of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 in regards to campus sexual assault cases. Title IX prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs or activities in schools that receive federal funding. The letter explains that schools are required to develop and distribute policies regarding sexual harassment, designate a Title IX coordinator to oversee the school's duties, train staff and students in sexual harassment and violence issues, and establish an investigation procedure and an adjudication process. The letter did not articulate specific procedural safeguards, rules for the examination of evidence, or guidelines for the conduct of adjudication or hearing processes for cases of campus sexual violence.

    Harassment in schools can occur when a student is discriminated against on the basis of national origin, race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, gender, or other identifiable class. A school district may be found liable for harassment if there is no strong, widely disseminated, and consistently enforced policy prohibiting it and no effective complaint procedure is in place. Schools can also be held responsible for the consequences stemming from a failure to take immediate, appropriate steps to respond to a complaint about harassment or bullying, terminate it, and discipline the offending party, be it an employee or another student. When a school has knowledge that a hostile environment exists but does not act on this knowledge, it can be viewed as giving tacit approval to this activity. In such cases, school districts have been found liable for enabling hostile school environment that prevents students from learning.

    The relationship between private schools and their students is very different than the one that exists when a student is in a public school. In private schools, the relationship is contractual in nature. The contract is expressed or implied in written documents, such as promotional literature, student applications, and student and staff handbooks. By contrast, the relationship between public schools and students is governed by federal and state statues, such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Title IX. In public schools, students are afforded constitutional, substantive, and procedural protections that are generally not applicable in a private school. In private schools, academic and conduct issues involving students raise contractual, as opposed to constitutional, issues.

    Injuries are a part of intramural and extramural sports and recreation programs. According to the National Federation of State High School Associations, high school athletes account for 2 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits, and 30,000 hospitalizations each year. There's a certain level of risk assumed by a child who participates in any physical activity, but the school or agency has a general duty to protect children from harm to avoid school sports injury lawsuits. Dereliction of that duty may result in any number of situations that a jury may consider negligent, such as failure to develop and implement appropriate policies and procedures for supervision, poor maintenance of equipment, or inadequate instruction of children about the dangers inherent in their activity.

    Student injury or death often brings negative attention to a school. In fact, the first thing often reported publicly is an injured party's claim that an incident stemmed from the negligence or misconduct of a staff member responsible for a child's safety - a teacher, coach, or bus driver, for instance. But a student injury or death can result from any number of situations. These might range from school-related action or inaction, such as a breach of school security or failure to follow a student's medical orders, to a student's own actions and choices triggering a contributory negligence defense.

    For schools, daycare centers, after-school programs, and camps, children with disabilities often present significant supervisory challenges. If these children's needs are not adequately addressed and a child is seriously injured or killed, negligent supervision may be viewed as a proximate cause. But what constitutes reasonable supervision of children with behavioral or physical disabilities? It depends on the unique needs of the student and a school's standards for protecting that student from harm.

    This article reviews recent legislation and how that legislation effects compliance with student IEPs in regards to the equipment that can improve a student's ability to learn and interact with teachers, family, and friends. The article details the recommendation of devices and the school's responsibility in regards to their procurement, usage, and maintenance.

    Recently, a Seattle student with cerebral palsy was awarded $300,000 in damages from her school after years of harassment by another student was allowed to take place. Her harasser regularly called her names, blocked her wheelchair's path with furniture and manipulated her chair's electronic controls so it rammed into walls. It was not until the harasser caused his target serious physical injury and property damage that school officials responded formatively to his hostility by suspending him for three days.

    Abstract: This special paper introduces the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, describes the school district's obligation to advocate for students with disabilities, reviews student rights created by the law, defines key terms, and takes the reader, step by step, through the procedural protections provided by the regulations.

    Abstract: Examples of consultations serve as an illustration of how a consulting education expert can assist lawyers who are working on school and education related cases. One example deals with a special education dispute involving inclusion and the other deals with liability for student injury and a settlement of $850,000.

    The tragic realities of the school killings in Littleton, Colorado, and similar instances of violence involving today's youth, have educators, policymakers and communities searching for causes as well as methods of prevention. Hit lists, posted on Internet sites and plans made by high school students to "get even" when they are teased are symptoms of what we already know: Bullying, teasing and discrimination are big problems for American children.

    Our nation's schools pay millions of dollars annually in damages to school children injured in class, sexually assaulted by teachers, and harassed by fellow students. Unnecessary risks in schools can be controlled to protect the safety of students, faculty and support staffs and to eliminate costly litigation and settlements.

    Even the most amicable custody arrangements can sour over school choice. As more people move about, the issue of where their children will attend school, and what that school offers compared to their current situation, is becoming more significant in family law. This article examines ways an education expert can assist with objective evaluations of school programs.

    The educator as a consulting and testifying expert has become one of the most important tools that an lawyer can use in the dispute resolution process involving schools. When the consultant becomes an expert witness the relationship changes. This article explains how the expert educator assesses merits of a case, and provides consultation to lawyers who are working on education and school related cases.

    6/19/2013 · Expert Witnessing
    According to a new national survey, there has been a sharp drop in the percentage of America's children being physically bullied or beaten up by their peers.

    5/13/2013 · Expert Witnessing
    Assigning fault and responsibility in a lawsuit involving a school is rarely clear cut.

    3/25/2013 · Expert Witnessing
    Eyewitnesses to the event may only tell what they saw, heard, felt or smelled; they are not allowed to tell what others have said (hearsay) or say what they think of the case.

    The first wave of inclusion has crashed upon the shores of our schools. Now, educators and parents are looking toward the horizon awaiting the next wave to see what it brings.

    Now that the administrative law judge ordered Heather into the regular fourth-grade classroom, none of the teachers want to have her, Maybe we shouldn't have filed for a due process hearing against the school. I think it backfired on us.

    Schools seem to have little control over the financial and human resources that are dedicated to special education. How can accountability be achieved?

    This article explores common situations regarding sexual harassment in the school setting. It also discusses exploitation of sexual power either by teachers or by students in an inappropriate relationship. Schools and its employees have a duty to train their students on their sexual harassment policies and to report any inappropriate behavior.

    5/14/2012 · Social Issues
    Cyberbullying is one of the fastest-growing problems facing families and the people responsible for protecting our children: school administrators, lawmakers and law enforcement officials. Cyberbullying is such a new frontier, the laws that define and police it are, in many places, weak to nonexistent. Its "sudden" pervasiveness and severity is now shocking people into action as evidenced by the rash of suicides making national news and the resulting public outcry.

    The safety of children is of the utmost concern to school board members, administrators, and teachers. Accidents do happen, of course, but you must do everything you can to make sure that the students in your care are not hurt.

    People who are passionate about school safety have a vision--a vision we share with concerned parents, educators, and especially with the kids we're obliged to protect.

    All 15-year-old Phoebe Prince wanted was to be liked. But after moving from Ireland to Massachusetts, it wasn't long before Phoebe endured bullying from the "mean girls" at school.

    It is commonly accepted that school liability has increased over the past several years, especially in the area of tort liability.

    Edward F. Dragan EdD
    Bullying used to be thought of as an unpleasant rite of passage, but now psychologists are realizing that it inflicts real harm. As many as 40 percent of children report that they’ve experienced episodes of bullying at school or online through their school community. School safety expert Edward Dragan argues that parents need to be proactive in looking out for their children’s social well being at school. From his many decades as a Board of Education insider, he argues that schools are self-protective entities and reluctant to address bullying themselves.
    Check for SynapsUs
    Erin O'Callaghan, MA, JD, CRC, NCC, LPC, CLCP
    145 S. Livernois #102
    Rochester Hills Michigan 48307
    phone: 248-312-9597
    Erin O’Callaghan, MA, JD, CRC, NCC, LPC, CLCP, is a Life Care Planner, Vocational Rehabilitation Consultant, and Licensed Attorney with over 11 years of experience as a Rehabilitation Professional.

    Ms. O’Callaghan has consistently provided the highest standards of professional ethics while staying current with the needs of modern and complex litigation. Her experience and training gives a unique perspective as a forensic rehabilitation evaluator. She has an in depth understanding of the evidentiary requirements of an expert’s evaluation and conclusion, including the importance of following an accepted methodology in the process and preparation of an opinion.

    Ms. O’Callaghan is a member of the International Association of Rehabilitation Professionals, International Academy of Life Care Planners, Michigan Rehabilitation Association, and the Michigan Bar Association. She is also a qualified Vocational Expert by the Social Security Administration.

    Erin O’Callaghan has been providing Litigation Support to counsel for Plaintiff and Defense for 11 years. She has provided over 1,000 cost projections and has testified in both Federal and State cases. Ms. O’Callaghan has specialized knowledge of the Affordable Care Act, Social Security issues, and Medicare Set Asides. Her services include case management, earning capacity evaluations, long term care evaluations, and personal injury assessments.

    Litigation Support Services for:
    • Tortious Injury / Negligence
    • Medical Malpractice
    • Worker's Compensation
    • Auto No Fault
    • Wrongful Death
    • Long Term Disability
    • Divorce
    View Erin O’Callaghan's Consulting Profile.
    Check for SynapsUs
    Dr. Steve C. Imber
    One Davol Square,Suite 111
    Providence RI 02903
    phone: 401-421-4004
    fax: 401-233-0946
    Dr. Steve C. Imber is a Psychoeducational Consultant who serves as an evaluator and expert witness to attorneys in the areas of child custody, DUI, lead poisoning, educational competence, Miranda warning issues and special education.

    Dr. Imber also addresses the needs of Children, Adolescents and Adults concerning Attention Deficit Disorder, Learning and Behavioral Disabilities for Children and Adolescents, Learning Disabilities for Adults and Forensic Evaluation.

    A noted author and speaker, Dr. Imber has been a Presenter and/or Session Leader at several National Council for Exceptional Children's Conferences as well as several State and Regional Conferences, LRP Annual National Conference on Legal Issues of Educating Individuals with Disabilities.
    7/6/2011 · Psychology
    Prior to 1966, the Supreme Court sought to define the Constitution's protection against self-incrimination with regard to juveniles, to the mentally impaired, and to psychological coercion by police (see Gallegos v. Colorado, 1962; Blackburn v. Alabama, 1960; Fikes v. Alabama, 1957; Chambers v. Florida, 1940).

    5/18/2011 · Psychology
    A parent has the right to an independent educational evaluation at the public expense if the parent disagrees with an evaluation obtained by the public agency.

    4/11/2011 · Psychology
    An independent educational evaluation (IEE) provides parents with an opportunity to obtain alternative sources of information concerning the present levels of performance of their children.

    Check for SynapsUs
    411 W. Maple Street, Apt. 305
    Wichita KS 67213
    phone: 316-630-9320
    fax: 316-630-9332
    William A. Lybarger, PhD, specializes in the field of Health and Human Services. With a Masters Degree in Special Education and a PhD in Psychology (behavior disorders), has worked as a director, administrator, manager, teacher, consultant, executive coach, and expert witness in the Healthcare field.

    He brings to the industry a record of publication, presentation of reality-based management strategies and teaching that supports his pursuit of organizational success templates which coincide with achieving sustainable competitive advantage.

    As an Expert Witness, Dr. Lybarger provides Standard of Care opinions related to quality of care and treatment provided by health, education, and human service agencies. He has extensive training and experience in health and human service management, special education, quality assurance, performance management, and regulatory compliance.

    Dr. Lybarger has been asked to provide his expert opinion related to personal injury and wrongful death in over 70 cases. The quality of his work is supported by 30 years of experience in the management of community and residential supports systems for persons with mental retardation.

    Dr. Lybarger's casework has included:
    • Developmental Disabilities, Juvenile Treatment Facilities, Private Psychiatric Facilities, Community Mental Health Centers, and Special Education
    • Mental Retardation
    • Care Issues related to Medical Centers, Nursing Homes
    • Loss of Life Potential
    • Personal Injury
    • Wrongful Death
    View Dr. Lybarger's Consulting Profile.
    5/6/2015 · Psychology
    I have been providing expert witness services for several years. My practice, for the most part, has involved personal injury and wrongful death matters in health and human service agencies. More specifically, my work frequently requires a Standard of Care opinion related to the level of care provided by a service organization to a person with a developmental disability and/or mental retardation. As a part of this practice I have worked several cases involving an eating disorder referred to as PICA.

    Most organizations will eventually face hard times. I am suggesting that organizational leaders see this event as an opportunity rather than a trauma.

    What is the fastest way to increase profits? Stop doing things that don't make a profit! Could increased net profit, increased return on investment and improved cash flow be that easy? The answer is yes.

    Check for SynapsUs
    Lawrence M. Misel
    4642 Pepper Mill Street
    Moorpark CA 93021
    phone: 818-943-0791
    Lawrence M. Misel has over 40 years of experience as it relates to Secondary Education, including high school, middle school, and continuation high school. Mr. Misel earned a Master's Degree in the Social / Philosophical Aspects of Education and has been trained in "Common Core", International Baccalaureate, and Special Education (RtI). His professional certifications include Administrative Services and Secondary Education (Social Science).

    Background - Mr. Misel has a unique perspective having served as a teacher, coach, assistant principal, and principal at the middle school, continuation school, and comprehensive high level. His last principalship was for fifteen years at Agoura High School, in Agoura Hills, CA.

    Litigation Support - Mr. Misel's array of professional experience along with his knowledge, personal commitment, thorough documentation instruments, and understanding of the application of district / state policies, as well as, the California Education Code make him an ideal candidate for educational litigation support. Mr. Misel offers expert witness services to counsel representing both Plaintiff and Defense.

    Areas of Expertise:
    • School Policy and Procedures
    • Compliance
    • FRISK
    • Supervision
    • Behavior Problems
    • Faculty Issues
  • Faculty Review
  • Teacher Training
  • School / Campus Safety
  • At Risk Students
  • Student Activities
  • School Athletics
  • View Lawrence Misel's Consulting Profile.
    Check for SynapsUs
    Virginia Rhodes, EdD
    1549 Wittlou Ave.
    Cincinnati OH 45224
    phone: 513-207-2566
    Virginia Rhodes, EdD has an extensive background in Urban Public Schooling. She has over 35 years of experience in School Policy, Strategic Planning, Organizational Development, Administrative, Supervisory, Evaluation and Instruction in K-12 settings.

    As principal and policy-maker, Dr. Rhodes was known for her work in reclaiming failing high schools, including moving an Ohio high school from 8% passage on the state science test to 54.5% in 2 years, collaboratively, within a contractual environment.

    Dr. Rhodes provides Expert Witness testimony and preparation services for districts and law firms. She is available to represent both Plaintiff and Defense. Dr. Rhodes' services are available nationally and internationally.

    Specialties Include:
    • School and School District Policy
    • Organizational Development, School, District Structural Planning
    • Standards of Administrative and Teacher Practice
    • Teacher Training / Evaluation, Administrative Training
    • School Climate, SEL, Discipline Methodologies, Applications
    • Diversity Issues within Personnel and Student Settings
    • Urban School Research
    • Deposition Digests & Document Review
    • STEM, Environmental, Magnet, and other Specialty Programming
    • Conditions Affecting Low-income Students: Mobility, Poverty
    • Urban Schooling / High-risk Settings
    • Innovative & 21st Century Practices - Domestic and Abroad
    • Academic Achievement and Program Development
    View Dr. Rhodes' Consulting Profile.
    What does it take to improve science performance in an inner-city high school? Could a science "immersion" strategy change motivation and interest in science? How can we meet a key strategic goal of our urban district: "All students graduate and are prepared for postsecondary education, successful careers and productive citizenship."

    Creative professionals in team-based work settings value work communications skills among their colleagues. As public schools create professional learning communities and experiment with teacher-led curriculum and program development, traditional interview processes may prove inadequate for these new collaborative environments. New and creative selection models may be needed to enable teacher or other professional teams to choose candidates with the 21st century skills needed for success. In public sector environments, work rules are often highly developed and professionals are entitled to interview. Qualifications, training, experience and seniority as determinants often get reduced to transfer rights using seniority as the main or only criteria. This trend detracts from creating a competitive environment in which to attract & retain a high-quality teaching staff. Solutions can be found within existing contract parameters, however, if the attributes necessary to teach 21st Century skills are actually required to be demonstrated, not just described, in the interview process.

    "All children can learn," is a catchphrase currently making the rounds in education circles, particularly in staff development activities (Pankratz & Petroski, 2003). De facto learning theory challenges the underlying assumptions of this phrase by examining how it is that learning in schools takes place. Using theoretical foundations of Dewey, Maslow, and Vygotsky, this essay will explore the fact that all children are, in fact, learning all the time, regardless of the actions of teachers, the content of the curriculum, or educational policy and practice.

    Critical to a dynamic STEM school is a high level of instructional rigor. While this is true in all STEM schools, it is a particular challenge in those programs that serve populations inexperienced with high levels of rigor in their previous coursework.

    OK, I did learn enough in 35 years of high school teaching, administration, and marriage to know one thing: The way to anyone's heart is through their stomach! Feed them, and they will come.

    Establishing a STEM High School (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics), and the Aiken Environmental, Ohio's first public environmental high school proved to be successful strategies to increase student engagement and raise standardized scores in science. High-poverty urban students from declining academic and disciplinary environments produced significant gains on science test results and credit attainment towards graduation. Using multiple overlapping rigor and SEL strategies, students experienced "science immersion," project-based learning, and a social-emotional curriculum that emphasized personal development and team/community-building skills.

    Check for SynapsUs
    Richard L. Swanson, PhD
    785 Tucker Road
    Suite G-154
    Tehachapi CA 93561
    phone: 530-277-9603
    Richard SwansonRichard L. Swanson, PhD is a former School Administrator, Principal and Superintendent with over 39 years of experience in Education. He earned a PhD in Social /Developmental Psychology from the School of Education at UC Berkeley and has been a driving force in successful negotiations, mediations and several high-profile litigations of key Educational Issues which include Sexual Harassment, Student Complaints, Teacher Grievances as well as Discipline, Dismissal and Release.

    Dr. Swanson has worked directly with the Office of Civil Rights, the Department of Justice, the California Department of Education’s Fiscal office, the California State Controller and the California State Attorney General’s Offices. He speaks with articulate, persuasive and knowledgeable authority based solidly on his academic training and 39 years of practical experience. His credibility as an Expert Witness rests on 9 years as a teacher and instructional consultant, 12 years in the private sector as a manager/planner and financial executive and 18 years in school leadership as a principal and superintendent.

    Dr. Swanson has written over 16 teachers’ guides, one book on finance and numerous published articles on educational topics. He has expertise in:
    • School Reform
    • School Fraud Prevention and Prosecution
    • School Safety
    • Title IX Compliance
    • Teacher Discipline, Dismissal, Release
    • Special Education Compliance
    • School Improvement
  • NCLB and Achievement Gap Issues
  • Bullying / Harassment
  • School Facilities
  • School Finance
  • Educational Evaluation
  • Social Development
  • School Supervision
  • View Consulting Profile.
    Check for SynapsUs
    Dr. Joseph S. Schwartzberg
    1831 Goldenrod Lane
    Vista CA 92081
    phone: 760-705-0106
    Dr. Joseph S. Schwartzberg, is an Educational Consultant / Expert Witness who provides consultation and testimony on cases involving students with disabilities.

    Dr. Schwartzberg was responsible for developing and administering legally compliant special education programs for the 14 districts of North San Diego County. For 13 years, he served as the Senior Director of the North Coastal Consortium for Special Education for the San Diego County Office of Education. For the 7 years prior, he was the Division Director for the Southern Westchester Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES).

    Litigation Support - Dr. Schwartzberg provides expert witness services to counsel representing both Plaintiff and Defense. He offers assistance with civil, family court, and due process (OAH) matters.

    Areas of Expertise:
    • IDEA
    • Inclusion
    • Mainstreaming
    • Standards of Care
    • Other Agency Responsibilities
    • Non-public Schools
    • Appropriate Programming for Students with Disabilities
    Certification / Credentials:
    • School Administrator and Supervisor (SAS)
    • School District Administrator (SDA)
    • Professional Clear Administrative Services Credential
    • Professional Clear Single Subject Teaching Credential : Health Science
    • Learning Disabilities, Emotionally Handicapped, General Special Education
    • Nursery, Kindergarten, Grades 1-6
    • Health and special classes of the orthopedically and similarly handicapped
    • Teacher of children with special learning handicaps