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Machinery Equipment Appraisal Expert Witness Jack Young

Jack Young, ASA—MTS/ARM, CPA
President, CEO
902 Hemenway Street
Winters CA 95694
phone: 530-795-5536
fax: 866-421-1108
Jack Young Valuation Expert PhotoJack Young, ASA—MTS/ARM, CPA is an Accredited Senior Appraiser (ASA) of the American Society of Appraisers specializing in Machinery and Equipment Appraisals (MTS) and Appraisal Review (ARM/MTS). He is also a Certified Public Accountant (CPA). Mr. Young has also been awarded a Master Personal Property Appraiser (MPPA) designation from the National Auctioneers Association. He has thousands of hours experience as an Equipment Appraiser and is an active member of the Northern California Chapter of the ASA, where he serves as Past Chapter President.

In addition to his CPA designation and background,Mr. Young worked for many years as an auctioneer and auction manager of machinery and equipment and business assets. His experience in Auditing, Accounting, Financial Analysis, and Auctioneering provides a strong base for the asset valuation concepts embraced by the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) and the appraisal industry today. As an equipment appraiser, Mr. Young performs Certified / Qualified Equipment Appraisals in Northern California and Western Nevada.

As an accredited Senior Appraiser with an Appraisal Review designation in the specialty of Equipment and Machinery, Jack Young provides valuable litigation support services. As an expert witness, he offers defendable USPAP machinery and equipment appraisals that can withstand the scrutiny of the legal system and has experience testifying in trials and depositions. Mr. Young teaches and co-authored the ASA Appraisal Review classes for the ARM designation. His services are available to attorneys for plaintiff and defense.

Areas of Specialization
  • Construction Equipment Appraisal
  • Manufacturing Equipment Appraisal
  • Agricultural Equipment Appraisal
  • Restaurant Appraisal
  • Food Processing Equipment Appraisal
  • Aircraft Appraisal
  • Truck Appraisal
  • Cost Segregation Studies
  • Business Combination
  • Fire
  • Insurance
  • Liquidation
  • View Jack Young's Consulting Profile.
    Appraising inventory is generally one of my least favorite assignments; in the case of fire loss, however, even a static inventory can become more interesting, if only because of its absence. Combined with an absence of appropriate record keeping, the process of valuing the lost stock takes us into a level of detective work that can be both frustrating and rewarding.

    How do we appraise equipment that's been destroyed or stolen? Of course we hope for good records - photos, equipment lists, maintenance records - but rarely are those available. Often whatever records might have existed have been lost in the same fire that destroyed the equipment. In most of the fire cases we've been called into, the underlying problem can be that either that the insurance company doesn't agree with the loss value submitted by the claimant or that nobody can confirm what has actually been lost.

    Equipment appraisers often claim expertise in particular markets. And we do often become experts through our experience in valuing a particular industry throughout the years. In many situations, however, it's more important to be an equipment appraisal expert than an industry expert! An expert equipment appraiser knows how to research the processes and equipment lines of a specialty industry, is able to locate and interview dealers and other experts in that field, and understands how to calculate values for specialty equipment that often does not have a viable market for used equipment sales. An expert equipment appraiser is an expert in USPAP compliance, producing a well-written report in compliance with the research standards of USPAP.

    Considering an ad valorem tax appeal for your business? Business owners who provide independent equipment values researched by experienced, qualified equipment appraisers are more successful in their tax appeal. Whether negotiating assessed values with the county property appraiser or in a value adjustment board hearing, a taxpayer who's prepared with a USPAP equipment appraisal review has a better chance of having their assessed values reduced.

    Several equipment appraisal report clients have recently asked me to include information on California's on-going drought conditions and how current and continuing conditions might affect the value of the equipment appraised.

    2/1/2016 · Machinery
    Sharing a machinery and equipment appraiser in a legal conflict is one of the more practical methods of reducing costs and discord. While the concept of shared experts is not new to legal proceedings concerning issues like mergers and collateral lending, I've been encouraged to see this refreshing trend gain momentum in family law cases as well.

    A previous post introduced the 3 Rules of Appraisal Review, and in a perfect world, the equipment appraisal report you're basing financial decisions on would always meet these 3 basic rules.

    Appraisal review raises the bar on appraisal reports by providing professional, expert review of the appraiser's qualifications, how well the report aligns with standards of appraisal practice, and whether or not the appraisal report itself makes logical sense to a trained professional. Failure of an appraisal report to meet any of these three qualifications indicates that the report under review cannot be depended upon.

    Reconciliation is the final process for the equipment appraiser when more than one approach to value is used in an equipment. valuation. That process involves reconciling the values from the separate approaches and resolving, if necessary, any differences in order to arrive at a final opinion of value. The question here is: "Why in the world would an appraiser use more than one approach to value?"

    Let's say you're getting an equipment appraisal on your metalworking facility, your food processing plant, or a manufacturing facility, restaurant, or trucking company. When you think about how an equipment appraiser might research the values for your fleet vehicles, your kitchen equipment and dining room furniture, or for your CNC machines, drills, presses, etc., you probably assume the sales comparison approach. And in most cases, you might be right. But don't forget: Uniform Standards of Professional Practice (USPAP) recognizes three distinct valuation methodologies and it's important to consider all three before determining the correct approach for a particular appraisal. These three appraisal methodologies, or approaches to value, are Sales Comparison Approach, Cost Approach, and Income Approach.

    This case study deals with some of the practical considerations surrounding the accounting for the acquisition of a closely-held integrated dairy products operation and the subsequent disposal of a portion of the acquired assets. Specifically use and oversight of appraisers for determining fair value amounts necessary for acquisition accounting is examined. Additionally, the accounting implications of the subsequent disposal of assets are considered in light of the initial acquisition accounting.

    When clients call our office asking for an equipment appraisal review, I've found it's important to ask them the purpose of the appraisal review. That quickly opens up the discussion about what an equipment appraisal review is and is not. And believe me, not everyone understands the difference between an appraisal (a quantitative analysis) and an appraisal review (a qualitative analysis). Some think they are going to get an opinion of value to compare to the equipment appraisal they've requested a review of or whether I think the equipment values in the report are "right." That, however, isn't what an appraisal review is really about.

    4/30/2015 · Machinery
    Every machinery and equipment appraiser is most likely familiar with the phone call - "I've got some equipment that I need to have appraised. How much will it cost?"

    While equipment appraisals frequently rely on the Sales Comparison approach, researching an opinion of value takes an interesting turn when we appraise items for which there is not an active market. When a piece of specialized equipment cannot be compared to an item of similar utility, we can find a value by using the Cost Approach, known in machinery and equipment circles as "Trend and Bend."

    The concept of absorption is used relatively often in real estate appraisals and the same concept, known as "blockage," is well-documented in the art valuation world, particularly in tax-related appraisals.

    Retail propane companies may need their equipment appraised for collateral lending situations, buy-sell agreements, family law, estate tax or several other situations. Whatever the reason, when appraising retail propane equipment, it's important for an equipment appraiser to understand the overall retail propane industry as well as how the basic equipment - trucks and trailers, customer tanks, and large volume storage tanks - fits into the big picture.

    An appraisal review is a good choice whenever you feel uneasy about the qualifications of the equipment appraiser or confused about the methodology used in an equipment appraisal report. This could be a report you originally contracted for - or it could be an equipment appraisal report you've received from another party.

    Next time you walk into a grocery store, take a moment to appreciate all the equipment on the sales floor –– from the cantilevered gondola shelves to the automated checkout stands, the food bar, water dispensing machine, and of course, all the refrigerated display cases: enclosed freezers, reach-in refrigerated cases, the open topped freezer boxes that hold fish sticks and frozen chickens, the deli cases … and the equipment you don't see: the walk-in coolers and freezers and the refrigeration compression system that most grocery store visitors never see.

    8/25/2014 · Machinery
    In 1998, reacting to California's overall poor air quality, the federal government threatened to cut off or reduce the state's allocation of federal highway funds as allowed through the US Federal Clean Air Act, which, overhauled with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, mandates that every state meet the National Ambient Air Quality standards. In response, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) in September 2000, adopted the Diesel Risk Re duction Plan (Diesel RRP or Plan). RRP recommends many control measures to reduce risks associated with diesel particulate matter (PM) and achieve a goal of 75 percent PM reduction by 2010 and 85 percent by 2020. These CARB regulations may be a harb inger of national change as many other states, also out of compliance with the Federal Clean Air Act, are poised to adopt similar diesel emission rules.

    RN's Beverly McFarland and her associate, Kevin Whelan of The Beverly Group, Inc., recently gave a presentation in San Francisco to the Northern California Chapter of the American Society of Appraisers ("ASA") on "Challenges of Appraising Special Assets". The emphasis was on the appraisal of assets in chapter 11 bankruptcies and receiverships and the differences between the two entities and how they are administered. Through the new acquaintances that we met that evening, we discovered some fascinating appraisals that members of the ASA have completed that we would like to share with Receivership News readers.

    6/10/2014 · Equipment Leasing
    As pointed out in the previous Leased Equipment post, today's equipment lessor must be more knowledgeable than ever before about the value of leased equipment: Many leasing decisions, from the initial transaction pricing through the ultimate disposition of the equipment, are based on the value of the underlying asset. In addition, it's critical to have an accurate projection of residual values.

    Over the years, I've done a number of valuations on leased equipment for various reasons. It's almost aways the case that the folks who are leasing the equipment and the folks who own it don't agree on what the value of the equipment is or even what the premise of value should be for the equipment being appraised. Most equipment appraisers would probably agree that valuing leased equipment is more straightforward if the contract specifies a premise of value, but we know we can't count on that. What we can count on is that equipment lessors will continue to need their equipment appraised. This post is really for them. And I want to thank Bob Podwalny, again, for the generous contribution of his knowledge and experience in this area.