banner ad
Experts Logo

articles

Project Team Motivators and Demotivators

By: Long International, Inc. - Michael J. Vallez, P.E., MBA, Lean Six Sigma
Tel: (303) 972-2443
Email: Long International, Inc.


View Profile on Experts.com.


1. INTRODUCTION

The leader of a corporation or project is the individual who must ultimately be willing to take responsibility for results. Within the context of an organization or team made up of individuals, it is the collective performance of the individuals, as a team, that defines the results of the whole. While it can be said that the best motivation is internal motivation as opposed to external motivation, the leader is ultimately the one responsible for creating the conditions where motivation can thrive.

In any job, there are circumstances which motivate and those which demotivate. It is up to the leader to be aware of which is which. According to the Pareto principle (the 80/20 rule), it is essential for the leader to know what factors most contribute to results, to help guide his or her focus.

This article discusses: (i) typical motivators and demotivators on construction sites; (ii) the Foreman Delay Survey, which is a good way to identify and eliminate obstruction factors and demotivators; (iii) Herzberg's principles concerning motivators and demotivators; and (iv) my experiences from managing construction projects and life in general.

This article is a slightly modified chapter from my book, On Time and Under Budget: The Ultimate Power of Team Leadership, published in 2014.

2. MOTIVATORS AND DEMOTIVATORS

Below is a list of motivating factors from a survey of twelve construction sites. If you work in construction, make sure that you have these things in place:

  • Good relationships among all people involved;
  • Good orientation program;
  • Good safety program;
  • Pay;
  • Overtime pay;
  • Recognition;
  • Defined goals;
  • Open house and project tour;
  • A well-planned project; and
  • Suggestions solicited.

The demotivators, things to avoid and/or eliminate, are as follows:

  • Disrespectful treatment;
  • Lack of material and tool availability;
  • Having to do work over;
  • Crew discontinuity;
  • Project confusion;
  • Lack of recognition;
  • Ineffective utilization of skills;
  • Incompetent personnel;
  • Lack of cooperation among crafts;
  • Overcrowding;
  • Poor inspection programs;
  • Communication breakdowns;
  • Unsafe conditions; and
  • Lack of participation in decision making.

3. FOREMAN DELAY SURVEY

In the construction industry, the Foreman Delay Survey is a way to identify and eliminate obstructive factors and demotivators. The following are the steps:

First, the foreman completes a daily survey of project delays for a week so as to identify what is causing the holdups.

Second, the delays are evaluated, solutions brainstormed, and improved working methods are implemented.

Finally, the results of the new ways are analyzed, and the cycle starts again, if necessary.

Figure 1
Foreman Delay Survey Cycle

Image

One might think that a good supervisor does not need to do this, but I have applied these principles to projects thought to be going smoothly and has always found that the Foreman Delay Survey makes a difference. Even the front-line foremen are surprised when they quantify their delays.

For example, on a recent project, I had a superintendent who, for some reason, did not want to hear about problems from the workers or the foremen. People were pulling me aside to tell me, the project manager, about problems they were having in the field. I noticed the superintendent's behavior whenever a problem was raised by someone under his command. He took it as a personal attack, instead of a call for help. This was an ideal situation for the Foreman Delay Survey.

Figure 2
Smaple Foreman Delay Survey Results

Image

Figure 2 shows the results from the first week of that survey. The total delay time was 9% of the total available working hours. Frustrating delays can have a compounding effect on labor motivation. This is because as workers become more frustrated, they lose focus on safety and their jobs, leading to more frustration and more delays. In addition, frustration is one of the four mental states that leads to accidents. Most delays are management controlled, so management should use this technique as a listening tool to uncover problems. Once the problems are identified, the root causes can be identified and eliminated.

Having used this process on multiple projects, I have found that it takes about three weeks to achieve the organizational alignment necessary to eliminate most of the delays. The process should be used frequently, if not continuously, as a project moves through various stages. Most delays are management controlled, so it is absolutely critical that management uses this technique as a listening tool to uncover the root of the problems.

When combined with goal setting and the other principles, the Foreman Delay Survey is a simple and effective way to remove the problems, which lead to frustration and low morale, and consequently, a way of eliminating one of the root causes of accidents.

4. HERZBERG'S PRINCIPLES

. . .Continue to read rest of article (PDF).


Long International provides expert claims analysis, dispute resolution, and project management services to the Process Plant Engineering and Construction industry worldwide. Our primary focus is on petroleum refining, petrochemical, chemical, oil and gas production, mining/mineral processing, power, cogeneration, and other process plant and industrial projects. We also have extensive experience in hospital, commercial and industrial building, pipeline, wastewater, highway and transit, heavy civil, microchip manufacturing, and airport projects.

©Copyright - All Rights Reserved

DO NOT REPRODUCE WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION BY AUTHOR.

Related articles

Thomas-Barth-Crane-Logo.jpg

10/23/2015· Construction

Crane Training Lacking In U.S.: Other Countries Lead the Way to Safety

By: Thomas Barth

Here in the United States our crane training program is falling through the cracks. Other countries, such as Canada, have one of the best training programs in the world. The United States tried to put a program together by copying their program but unfortunately they left out the most valuable parts.

expert_placeholder

12/29/2010· Construction

Case Study: Certificate Of Occupancy Rescinded

By: Clinton J. Ford

A local Mortgage Company referred an Attorney to one of their clients because they were having construction problems. Their clients did not want the final disbursements made until these issues were resolved.

douglas-bassett-construction-project-management-expert-photo.jpg

10/21/2020· Construction

COVID-19 Claim Management on Construction Projects

By: Long International

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the internal and external project execution environments. The pandemic has caused impacts of varying degrees to nearly every aspect of projects involving the activity of people. Ordinary practices in the creation of project documentation are robust and are utilized to support the analysis of construction claims. Although project productivity losses may be demonstrable, providing compelling evidence and proof that the losses were caused by the pandemic may not be as easy to demonstrate.

;
Experts.com-No broker Movie Ad

Follow us

linkedin logo youtube logo rss feed logo