banner ad
Experts Logo

articles

What We Have Learned: Experiences in Providing Adaptations and Accomodations for Gifted and Talented Students With Learning Disabilities

By: Rich Weinfeld
Weinfeld Education Group, LLC

Tel: (301) 681-6233
Email Richard Weinfeld
Website: www.richweinfeld.com

Profile on Experts.com.


  • Would you allow a person to use a wheelchair?
  • Would you carry him or her?
  • If using a wheelchair gives someone an unfair advantage in a race, should his or her time count the same as that of other runners?
  • Would you allow a person to wear glasses for reading a test, even if they only help a little? What about glasses that are so strong that they give the person an ability to read faster than average?
  • Would you allow a person to use a word processor if you knew that the person had a severe writing disability but had ideas that showed evidence of giftedness?
  • Would you allow dictation for a gifted student who had a severe writing disability?
  • At a recent national conference on gifted education, participants shared their feelings about allowing accomodations for srudents in a variety of situations. For each accommodation, they gave a thumbs-up, a thumbs-down, or a thumbs-sideways response, depending on whether they agreed or disagreed with the appropriateness of the accomodation. The seminar participants demonstrated little agreement in their responses to the preceding questions. Reactions to the situations reflected their varying attitudes and perceptions about appropriate adaptations and accommodations.

    Twice-exceptional students, that is, students who are gifted and have learning disabilities (GLD), often need to have appropriate adaptations and accommodations (Barton & Starnes, 1989; Baum, 1991, 2004; Cline & Schwartz, 1999; National Association for Gifted Children; 1998) so that they can effectively gain access to enriched and accelerated instruction. Our experience in Maryland's Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) indicates that students often receive inadequate or inappropriate adaptations and accommodations, thereby making their access to gifted instruction problematic. The differing beliefs and opinions of teachers, parents, and students often lead to too few accommodations, or the wrong accommodations.

    A review of the research about GLD students and about successful programs for them reveals that the most important components in the education of GLD students is providing gifted and talented instruction in the student's areas of strength. However, programming for GLD students must simultaneously furnish support in the student's areas of weakness . . . Continue to article and footnotes (PDF).


    Rich Weinfeld, M.S., is currently the director of the Weinfeld Education Group, LLC, which provides advocacy to parents of students with learning challenges, trains parents and staff on educational topics, and offers consultation to school systems.

    See Rich Weinfeld's Profile on Experts.com.

    ©Copyright - All Rights Reserved

    DO NOT REPRODUCE WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION BY AUTHOR.

    Related articles

    edward-dragan-photo.jpg

    7/26/2017· Child Welfare

    Professional Standard of Care in the Field of School Administration and Student Supervision

    By: Dr. Edward Dragan

    Parents are responsible for the protection and care of their children, and there may be legal consequences if a parent negligently fails to take reasonable steps to protect his or her child from harm. As with parents, entities and agencies charged with the care and supervision of children are responsible for the protection of their health, safety, and well-being. A partial list of such entities or programs include daycare centers, preschools, summer camps, YMCA centers, K–12 private and public schools, private schools that provide residences for students, and residential centers for adjudicated youth. When a child is placed into the care and custody of such an organization, that entity assumes control and supervision over the child comparable to parental care - and is held to even a higher professional standard of care established within the field of education.

    Kim-Hart-Child-Abuse-Expert-Photo.jpg

    3/23/2015· Child Welfare

    Taint: A Question of Reliability, Not Credibility or Competence

    By: Kim Hart

    Isn't it interesting how the courts recognize taint in so many different contexts?1 We have an illegal search by the police and everything found during the illegal search becomes "fruit of the poisonous tree"-it is said to be tainted. The Houston Police Department's Crime Lab does not observe proper sterile procedures in handling DNA and the specimens are contaminated-they are said to be tainted. We have a lineup where the crime victim sees one White guy, three Hispanics, and two Blacks. The identification of the White guy is said to be tainted, the product of a suggestive or improper lineup.

    edward-dragan-photo.jpg

    2/6/2015· Child Welfare

    Mandatory Child Abuse Reporting and School Liability

    By: Dr. Edward Dragan

    When child abuse is alleged to have taken place in a school, daycare facility, preschool program, summer camp, or other entity responsible for the supervision and safety of children, there is always the possibility that the entity may be liable if negligence can be established. Schools and other entities with a duty to protect children often become embroiled in lawsuits alleging that breach of this duty was a proximate cause of a child's injuries. Though laws vary, states adopt a broad definition of child abuse, including physical and emotional abuse, neglect and abandonment, incest, sexual molestation, and sexual exploitation. Typically, a child abuse report must be made to a designated state agency responsible for child protective services when a person, in his or her official capacity, suspects or has reason to believe that a child has been abused or neglected, or knows that a child has been subjected to conditions that could reasonably be expected to result in harm.

    ;
    Experts.com-No broker Movie Ad
    Unicourt Logo Button

    Follow us

    linkedin logo youtube logo rss feed logo