Your browser is currently set to block JavaScript.

For full functionality of this site it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are the instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser.

After enabling javascript, please refresh the page to go back to experts.com site with full functionality

Would you turn off/on JavaScript?

It's a widely used language that makes the web what it is today, allowing for websites to be more responsive, dynamic, and interactive. Disabling JavaScript takes websites back to a time when they were simple documents without any other features.

What are the advantages of using JavaScript?

Speed. Since JavaScript is an 'interpreted' language, it reduces the time required by other programming languages like Java for compilation. JavaScript is also a client-side script, speeding up the execution of the program as it saves the time required to connect to the server.

banner ad
Experts Logo

articles

Best Practices In Coastal Construction

By: John Minor
Tel: 850-932-8720
Email Mr. Minor


View Profile on Experts.com.


Image

With sea levels rising by some reports and inch a decade and the prediction of stronger hurricanes todays aging building stock is at risk. In addition for new construction we must learn from the past. The proliferation of coastal development begs for consistent and sustainable construction techniques.

A look at the numbers

  • More than 6.5 million homes along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts are at risk of storm surge inundation, representing nearly $1.5 trillion in total potential reconstruction costs.
  • More than $986 billion of that risk is concentrated within 15 major metro areas, according to a report by property data and analytics firm CoreLogic.
    The five states with the highest total number of properties at risk include:
  1. Florida (2,488,277)
  2. Louisiana (738,165)
  3. New York (466,919)
  4. New Jersey (445,928)
  5. Texas (434,421).

The five states with the highest value of reconstruction costs for homes at risk include:

  1. Florida ($490,403,653,377)
  2. New York ($182,474,294,695)
  3. Louisiana ($161,062,467,382)
  4. New Jersey ($134,194,963,314)
  5. Virginia ($92,001,482,217)

In my experience as a general contractor, property damage appraiser and flood plain manger I have seen the results of inferior construction. Even the building code is just that the minimum, to that end I have enjoyed being part of research to make for more hardened homes and businesses to help protect my neighbors, friends and family. To that end I have found and would like to share with you a few programs that I feel are a great benefit to all of us together.

The first I would mention is from FEMA Building Sciences Bulleting P 55 Coastal Construction which I have been honored to serve in a small capacity in my work with Oakridge Labs on the capacity of uplift on shingles at the IIBHS facility in S. Carolina.

https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/3293#

In addition to the above I have got the opportunity to learn about the Fortified program where owners and contractors can learn and become certified in the construction of homes built to better standards that greatly increase the likelihood of survival in the event of a major storm. These include perils of both wind and flood.

https://www.disastersafety.org/

Closer to home and a great success for my part of Florida is our Rebuild North West Florida. Rebuild has been extremely successful in this program mitigating residences with a number of measures to strengthen homes against wind damage. These include the addition of clips around the permiter locking the top of the stud wall to the rafters. In addition they have methods of installing gable end bracing one of the most vulnerable to wind damage by ladder blocking into the structure at least 4 trusses. Craig Fugate FEMA administrator just celebrated the 10,000 th successful use of this program that uses 75% FEMA money to 25% private money

http://rebuildnwf.org/


John G. Minor, President of Complete General Contractors, is a third-generation Contractor and licensed instructor certified by the North Carolina Department of Insurance. He is a recognized expert on the costs and applications necessary to repair buildings damaged by manufacturer, builder liability, water damage or intrusion, mold, or asbestos.

©Copyright - All Rights Reserved

DO NOT REPRODUCE WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION BY AUTHOR.

Related articles

long-international-logo.jpg

3/12/2018· Construction

Proving the Cause-Effect Linkage

By: Long International

Contractor’s claim submittals and expert reports are often deficient in proving causation, i.e., the cause-effect linkage. These claims generally outline the owner-caused impacts and separately calculate quantum; however, the two are often not linked in any meaningful way. Most claims are settled prior to a decision by a panel, court, or board, and therefore these deficiencies are not made apparent. Yet, a well-prepared claim document which includes a persuasive and accurate causeeffect analysis can greatly improve the contractor’s chances of a successful recovery, either through negotiations or in arbitration/litigation. This analysis is difficult and often costly to prepare, and is therefore not performed in many disputes, which may be the reason why the claims fail.

richard_long_photo.jpg

5/17/2021· Construction

Analysis Of Concurrent Delay On Construction Claims

By: Long International

Concurrent delay is a vexed and complex technical and legal issue. Construction contracts often do not expressly provide direction as to the parties’ agreement when there is concurrent delay. Most simply require the contractor to provide notice and specifics when an owner-responsible delay event occurs.

michael-panish-logo.gif

8/31/2015· Construction

Cabinetry & Millwork: Defective Design or Defective Workmanship? Who is Responsible?

By: Michael Panish

My job as a cabinetry and millwork expert witness is to inspect and evaluate casework, cabinetry, or millwork that may have either failed or may be deficient in some way. Many of the past cases where I have been designated as the cabinetry and millwork expert witness have involved analyzing products that no longer exist because they have either been replaced or destroyed. What is available for review is often in the form of architectural elevations (renderings), photographs of the damaged cabinetry, or shop drawings and samples of the materials that were used. Generally, there is a question as to what entity is responsible for the monetary loss sustained. The usual course of action by attorneys is to sue all parties in the chain of events, from design through installation.

;
Experts.com-No broker Movie Ad

Follow us

linkedin logo youtube logo rss feed logo