banner ad
Experts Logo

articles

Construction Expert Witness Practice

By: Wayne Baruch
Tel: (908) 359-3748
Email Mr. Baruch
Website: www.artisansgroup.biz.


We all find ourselves in legal disputes from time to time. When this happens, the aggrieved party hopefully still has a good business relationship with the other party(ies) who were involved, and can also rely on discussion, a warranty, or a contract, for example, to resolve the matter, but we typically retain an attorney; hopefully one who specializes in the particular issue.

In addition to their legal expertise and possible skills in some technical specialty, attorneys often retain professionals who can expertly address subtleties of the dispute. An architect or engineer is the right person to evaluate structural design and aesthetic issues, among others. As a professional remodeler with a unique academic background and skills, The Artisans Group can address: general construction issues and techniques; applications of products & materials; project management, estimating, planning, and risk management; safe demolition; damage evaluation, and rules and regulations. As a result, we can effectively document standards of practice that will show that the "contractor" did actually perform professionally, or perhaps, that he failed to comply with the architect's specifications.

Depending, of course, on the issues at hand, your construction expert should: examine all construction documents, relevant building code, and land use law; perform a thorough site visit; be/become familiar with products' manufacturers' specifications; review facts of the case versus any regulatory agencies. This is only a sample of the factors that the expert should review. The expert's agreement may include a report, court appearances and/or depositions, and require a fee for each.

Presumably, our legal colleagues would agree that we cannot absolutely prevent legal problems, but we can reduce the risk of landing in a construction dispute:

  • Have a clear understanding of the products involved, the project's time frame, and the criteria for a legal construction contract and contractor.
  • Resources (the process and any issues to be addressed)
    • Local building department
    • Your construction professionals
    • NJ Department of Community Affairs
    • NY State's Division of Code Enforcement and Administration Under the Office of the Attorney General in PA and NJ
    • The Workshop page on our web site.
  • Mutual trust and respect are essential! Undeserved cynicism kills a project as effectively as a bad contractor. One key to working well with contractors and understanding durations, sequences, and the reasons for doing things is to ask good questions, and to trust the answers if they sound logical. Mistrust or second-guessing is a sign of a troubled project and an indication to talk and either restore trust or part company.
  • The golden rule is alive and well.
  • Don't cavalierly hire the least expensive bidder and expect professional results.


Wayne Baruch, is a skilled and accomplished Designer, Craftsman, and Project Manager with a long track record of successful on-time, on-budget completion that achieves win-win client and vendor relationships. His company, Artisans Group, LLC, is a full-service Remodeler that specializes in Older Buildings (from the late 1700's), Repairing Structural, Bug and Water Damage.

©Copyright - All Rights Reserved

DO NOT REPRODUCE WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION BY AUTHOR.

Related articles

coleman-horowitt-logo.jpg

8/23/2018· Construction

Court Confirms Knowledge of Unlicensed Status Does Not Bar Claim for Recovery

By: Darryl Horowitt

In a previous edition of Construction Alert we reported to you on White v. Cridlebaugh (2009) 178 Cal.App.4th 506, in which the court confirmed that an unlicensed contractor could be sued for recovery of funds, even though the owner had received a benefit from the work performed by the unlicensed contractor. In that case, the owner was unaware that the contractor was unlicensed until after the work was performed.

Thomas-Barth-Crane-Logo.jpg

10/23/2015· Construction

Crane Training Lacking In U.S.: Other Countries Lead the Way to Safety

By: Thomas Barth

Here in the United States our crane training program is falling through the cracks. Other countries, such as Canada, have one of the best training programs in the world. The United States tried to put a program together by copying their program but unfortunately they left out the most valuable parts.

wayne_baruch_logo.jpg

5/25/2011· Construction

Lead Based Paint: Compliance With EPA's RRP Rule (40 CFR 745); Renovation, Repair, And Painting...And The Real World

By: Wayne Baruch

By now, you have probably heard about the rules that tell us how to properly manage lead-based paint under the U.S. EPA, the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA), and most State, County, and Local governments.

;
Experts.com-No broker Movie Ad

Follow us

linkedin logo youtube logo rss feed logo