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Behavioral Analysis Expert Witnesses

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Lars Davidsson
Consultant Psychiatrist, MRCPsych, FRSM, MEWI
151A Kings Road
Westcliff on Sea Essex SS0 8PP
GBR
phone: 44-7969-181936
fax: 44-1702-440429
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Dr. Lars Davidsson, MRCPsych, FRSM, MEWI, is the Director of Psychiatry at the Anglo European Clinic. He applies an evidence-based, pragmatic approach to Psychiatric Health Care, combining Medication and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to treat client's quickly and efficiently.

During the last six years, Dr. Davidsson has been engaged with the local Criminal Justice Mental Health team. In addition, he has extensive experience appearing in court. Dr. Davidsson has appeared before Magistrates Courts, Crown Courts, County Courts and Military Tribunals. He is able to provide reports within most areas of General Adult Psychiatry but takes a special interest PTSD, Anxiety and Mood Disorders, and Transcultural Psychiatry.

Dr. Davidsson has undergone continuous formal training in Report Writing and Court Appearance and is a member of The Institute of Expert Witnesses. He has provided more than 600 reports in Civil and Criminal matters over the last nine years.

Services Include:
  • Anger Problems / Anger Management
  • Anxiety - Generalised Anxiety Disorder with or without Panic Attacks
  • Health Anxiety / Hypochondriasis
  • Simple and Complex Phobias - Dental, Driving, Social, etc.
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • Depression and Recurrent Depression
  • Excessive Drinking
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Adult ADHD
  • Eating Disorders - Overeating / Bulemia
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    Dr. Gilbert W. Kliman
    2105 Divisadero Street
    San Francisco CA 94115
    USA
    phone: 415-292-7119
    fax: 415-749-2802
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    Children's Psychological Health Center, Inc. - Our mission is to bring the highest quality of child, adolescent and adult psychiatric expertise to difficult civil litigation issues concerning children.

    Practice Specialties - Nationwide forensic child psychiatry, evaluation and testimony in over 225 civil cases involving claims of institutional neglect, psychological trauma, loss of parental services, abuse, often with multiple victims.

    Areas of Expertise:
    • Child Psychiatry
    • Forensic Psychiatry Evaluations, Reports and Testimony Concerning Psychological Issues such as Trauma
    • Institutional Negligence (schools, academies and residential treatment centers - particularly concerning allegations of abuse
    • Wrongful Death: Loss of Parental Services
    • Allegations of Child Abuse - whether individual or multiple children, family or institutional, we conduct objective evaluations or such complaints and assess the damages stemming from complaints we find confirmed by forensic studies
    • Mental Health in Disasters (earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, firestorms, tsunamis and wars
    • Children in Foster Care
    Gilbert W. Kliman, M.D. - Harvard Medical School

    Licensure and Board Certification
    • Fellow and Diplomat of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
    • Distinguished Life Fellow
    • American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
    • Certified in Psychoanalysis for Adults, Children and Adolescents by the American Psychoanalytic Association and the New York Psychoanalytic Institute
    Dr. Kliman won the International Literary Prize for Best Book concerning the Well Being and Nurture of Children, "Responsible Parenthood" and is the recipient of grants from over 50 private foundations and The National Institute of Mental Health.

    His research interests include the Psychological Trauma and Treatment of Severely Disturbed Children and their families, in-classroom psychotherapy.
    4/17/2013 · Psychiatry
    Preventive psychiatry is a branch of preventive or public health medicine. It aims to promote good mental health in individuals and to prevent the occurrence or reduce the incidence of psychiatric disease in a population.

    3/8/2012 · Psychiatry
    Here you will meet several children helped by Cornerstone who suffered from tragic losses and tragic circumstances. This chapter is essentially practical in its orientation to technique, describing several forms of treatment of bereaved children, with a minimum of theoretical essay. Probably the best definition of "mourning" for our current purposes is, "the totality of reaction to the loss of a loved object."

    11/19/2011 · Psychiatry
    Monroe was the kind of child from whom usually little is expected therapeutically. A member of a disadvantaged ethnic minority, he lived in the poverty of a big-city slum ghetto...

    9/27/2011 · Psychiatry
    The legal system and juries customarily weigh evidence more regularly than the psychoanalytic profession.

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    Lawrence Amsel, MD, MPH
    245 West 107th Street
    New York NY 10025
    USA
    phone: 212-592-3804
    fax: 212-678-6752
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    Lawrence Amsel Psychiatry Expert PhotoLawrence Amsel, MD, MPH, specializes in Family Loss and Forensic Psychiatry. With an MD from Yale University and an MPH in Biostatistics from Columbia University, Dr. Amsel combined his clinical expertise with his analytic mathematics background to become one of the early champions of the application of Decision Science, Game Theory, and Behavioral Economics to Psychiatric Research.

    Dr. Amsel provides Litigation Support services to attorneys representing Plaintiff and Defense. His services include medical record review for causation and standard of care.

    Areas of Expertise:
    • Medical Decision Making
    • Health Care Behavioral Economics
    • Health Care Game Theory
    • Pediatric Psychiatry
    • Public Health
    • Suicide
  • OCD
  • Family Loss
  • Neuropsychiatry
  • PTSD
  • Psychiatry
  • Grief
  • Background - In 2003, Dr. Amsel organized the first ever American Psychiatric Association symposium on applications of Game Theory to psychiatry. He has published articles and presented posters on Game Theory modeling of suicide, OCD, and PTSD.

    After 9/11, Dr. Amsel joined the Trauma Studies and Services division at the New York Psychiatric Institute, and has been involved in treating victims of 9/11 and their families, in training community clinicians in cutting edge treatments for PTSD and Complicated (Traumatic) Grief, as well as in doing research on optimal methods of disseminating this training.

    Dr. Amsel was recently involved in preparing the training materials for the National VA PTSD CBT training program in conjunction with Edna Foa’s group at University of Pennsylvania. He has worked with Joy Hirsch at the Program in Imaging and Cognitive Science (PICS) and with Elke Weber and Eric Johnson at the related Decision Imaging Group (DIG) as Director of Mathematical Psychiatry, with the goal of creating innovative collaborations involving fMRI and Decision Science, as applied to psychiatric disorders.

    Over the last several years, Dr. Amsel has been collaborating with Dr. Hoven at the Child Psychiatric Epidemiology Group (CPEG) working on understanding the connection between decision deficits, trauma and psychiatric disorders in the developing brain of children/adolescents. He has extensive clinical expertise within psychiatric research, as well as expertise in applying decision science tasks in psychiatric research settings.

    View Dr. Amsel's Consulting Profile.
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    Daniel Allen
    MB, BS, LLM, MRCGP, MRCPsych
    P.O. Box 1086
    Beaconsfield HP9 9AB
    GBR
    phone: 44-870-162-0671
    fax: 44-870-162-0672
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    Dr. Danny Allen, Consultant Adult Psychiatrist is fully trained and experienced in report writing and regularly appears as an Expert Witness in Family Proceedings. Dr. Allen is an Approved Clinician, approved under Section 12(2) of the Mental Health Act 1983 and a Cardiff University accredited Expert Witness and a member of the Expert Witness Institute, the Academy of Experts and the Society of Expert Witnesses. He holds consultancies with Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Workplace Health (Buckinghamshire Hospitals NHS Trust) The Maidenhead Clinic, Phoenix Mental Health Services/Cardinal Clinic and BMI The Shelburne Hospital.

    Dr. Allen appears in court regularly in public law cases. He has undertaken a number of high profile cases for Customs and Excise and the Crown Prosecution Service, including alleged rapes and murders. Dr. Allen provides services for lawyers, social services and businesses. His reports are also available to Employment & Housing Tribunals and Employers and Licensing Authorities.

    Type of Reports Prepared:
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Depression
  • Drug & Alcohol
  • Specific Phobia
  • Sexual Offense
  • Adjustment Disorder
  • Family Proceedings
  • Personal Injury
  • Criminal Reports
  • Head Injury
  • Capacity
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    Edward F. Dragan, Ed.D.
    Principal Consultant
    49 Coryell Street
    Lambertville NJ 08530
    USA
    phone: 609-397-8989
    fax: 609-397-1999
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    Professional consultation for schools, attorneys and individuals. Court-qualified education administration, liability, school review and special education expert. More than 30 years experience in education. National practice.

    DOCTORATE: Rutgers University - Education Administration.

    MASTERS: College of NJ - Special Education.

    MASTERS: Franklin Pierce Law Center - Education Law.

    LAWYERS - Document review. Case analysis, development and litigation support. Expert reports. Deposition and trial testimony. School evaluations and comparisons for matrimonial issues.

    SCHOOLS - Liability and management assessments. Policy review and recommendations. Program review and development. Special seminars.
    Parents send their children to school expecting that their kids will be safe. The parents trust that the school's staff will act in their place and look out for their children's welfare in the same way they would. The presence of security guards, school police, or resource officers at the school may even strengthen their trust, but this can be a false sense of safety. Just because guards and school police officers wear a uniform does not always mean additional protection for students. Reviewing and assessing the potential for harm to students and others on school grounds and at school-sponsored events requires careful consideration and proactive initiative to keep students safe, even when the presence of a security guard or school police officer may provide a veneer of safety. Inadequately screening, training, and supervising security guards and school police officers; failing to provide guards and officers with clear instructions for handling special circumstances known to the school; and inappropriately delegating the responsibility for keeping children safe can all be linked to student injury or death.

    6/21/2018 · Employment
    Statistically, it's safer to transport children to and from school by school bus than by car, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Association. But accidents and other bus-related incidents that result in student injury and negligence are frequently causes for litigation. Leaving students on the bus when it arrives at school, sexual abuse of students by the bus driver, bus aide, or other students, and injuries caused by student misbehavior are just a few situations that might result in liability for a school district or contracted private bus company.

    A school has a responsibility to protect students from harm. Will arming teachers or placing armed security guards and police in the building make our schools safer and prevent school shootings? There is a great deal of debate as to whether more or different forms of attention to school safety and security will lead to a reduction in school killings, but these ideas don't seem to be showing positive results. Perhaps arming school staff not with guns but with the training needed to relate to students in a positive way will go a long way toward preventing some students from carrying out their deadliest ideas resulting in school shootings.

    When risk is managed, injury, student death, and resulting litigation are less likely to occur. All too frequently, it is only after a tragedy that officials look back and ask, "How could this have been avoided?" Risk management is a far-reaching topic, but when focused on the professional standard of care in educational and other child and youth-serving organizations, it comes down to protecting the safety of participants in the care and custody of a school or other organization.

    Standard of care is a general expression of what constitutes care in professions such as medicine, nursing, education, or child care administration. In schools and other agencies responsible for the care and supervision of children, the professional standard of care is the ethical or legal responsibility of a professional to exercise the level of care, diligence, and skill that other professionals in the same discipline would apply in the same or similar circumstances. This, coupled with statutory requirements and case law, defines the care that an educational professional is responsible for providing to children which includes protection from child sexual abuse.

    Title IX, the law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender in public education programs, is also relevant in application of professional standards within the context of private school sexual abuse and harassment and their response to alleged incidents. Every school that accepts federal funding for any program or service it provides must adhere to Title IX. Most public schools, including charter schools and specialized education service commissions, accept federal assistance and, therefore, must comply with Title IX. Compliance requirements include, among other things, the development of policies prohibiting sexual harassment and assault, prompt and thorough investigation of complaints, training of staff, and the assignment of a person who oversees implementation of the law.

    7/26/2017 · Child Welfare
    Parents are responsible for the protection and care of their children, and there may be legal consequences if a parent negligently fails to take reasonable steps to protect his or her child from harm. As with parents, entities and agencies charged with the care and supervision of children are responsible for the protection of their health, safety, and well-being. A partial list of such entities or programs include daycare centers, preschools, summer camps, YMCA centers, K–12 private and public schools, private schools that provide residences for students, and residential centers for adjudicated youth. When a child is placed into the care and custody of such an organization, that entity assumes control and supervision over the child comparable to parental care - and is held to even a higher professional standard of care established within the field of education.

    Under Title IX, for a school to be held liable for denying an educational opportunity to a student who was sexually harassed or abused, the court must be convinced that the school had actual notice of prohibited behavior and that it acted deliberately indifferent to it. Often, it is a challenge to define what "actual notice" is and whether the school had such notice. If the school has no information on which to act to end harassment or abuse, it cannot be determined to be indifferent. In some of the cases we have worked on, however, there has been some level of notice that, if investigated, would have confirmed that harassment or abuse was taking place. Such notice could be a teacher hearing a rumor about a sexual relationship between another teacher and a student, a staff member watching a student speak in a sexually inappropriate way to another student, or the school receiving notice that that an off-campus sexual violence event is creating retaliation at school. Examples such as these may constitute actual notice, depending on the circumstances.

    Whenever children are involved in events on school premises, there is always the possibility of school district liability for incidents that happen on school grounds or at school-sponsored events. This foreseeability gives rise to a duty to take reasonable steps to prevent a child from being harmed. Public school districts may find themselves liable for injury - not only for those suffered by their own students, but also for those incurred by children who are invited onto school grounds, who attend separate programs on school grounds, and even those who are considered trespassers.

    Schools, including K-12 schools, colleges, and universities, have a responsibility to protect their students from harm. Harm includes the inability to benefit fully from education as a result of being in a hostile school environment. The politically motivated rhetoric and actions seen in schools during and after the presidential campaign can create a hostile school environment for which schools can be held responsible.

    Schools, after-school programs, summer camps, sunday schools, daycares and other agencies that supervise children are responsible for student safety of children in their care. Failing to apply the same attention to ensuring that non-licensed individuals, such as volunteers, meet the same standards as teachers and other paid staff can place students - and ultimately a school, district, or other agency - at risk. When the history of a volunteer or chaperone on an overnight school trip includes something that would raise a red flag but the school is unaware of it, school officials are not able to make an informed decision about whether or not that person should be allowed to interact with children.

    Protection of the health, safety, and well-being of children who participate in recreational activities at a summer camp, summer school program, or community and private recreation centers should be the standard operating procedure of all those who provide these services. The standard of care owed to children who participate in organized or sponsored recreational activities such as sports, dance, swimming, rock climbing and variety of other activities at a camp or other agency must be consistent with professional standards in the field. Ingraining standardized practices and responsible planning and supervision into the work habits of all employees will help to protect the employees and the agency from activity injury liability and costly litigation.

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any education program, including in colleges and universities, if those programs or activities associated with the institution receive federal funding. Under Title IX, sex discrimination includes sexual harassment, sexual battery, sexual assault, rape and other sexual violence at school, college or university campuses. Any behavior that disrupts a student's access to an educational opportunity or benefit constitutes a violation of Title IX. Recent media coverage has brought to light the controversy over the six-month sentence for a former Stanford University student for the rape of a student on campus. There has been outrage over the sentence, and that outrage might be justified, given schools' responsibilities in similar cases.

    Some of our most vulnerable children are relegated to a life away from parents, family, and their school to live where other adults take the place of their parents and are responsible for their custody or care - legally defined as in loco parentis. This occurs when children are placed in residential centers for the treatment of mental illness, schools for the deaf and blind, or similar facilities for children who require extensive medical care and management.

    Nationwide, 7.6 million students participate in interscholastic athletics, according to U.S. News and World Report. Keeping them safe is critically important to avoid school liability and sports injury lawsuits. And when sports injury occurs, schools may be found responsible if they failed to take reasonable precautions and supervision of students in order to prevent sports injury. Parents send their children to school with the implicit expectation that schools will do whatever is necessary to keep them safe whether in the classroom or on the football field.

    As difficult as it might be to accept and understand, abuse of children is occurring at an alarming rate in our nation's schools, daycare centers, camps, and other institutions. Even with state laws that require child abuse reporting and institutional policies that address sexual abuse prevention, identification, and reporting, abuse is not going away. More civil lawsuits are filed with each passing year, and schools and other organizations are not always appropriately responding to this epidemic.

    In the wake of recent incidences of gun violence, school safety and security has become an increasingly pressing concern in the United States and Canada. Schools, summer camps, daycare centers, and other agencies charged with the safety of children have a duty to protect them, and their ability to do so depends on solid policies, training, and appropriate response to security threats. Laws, regulations, and internal policies designed to shield children from harm may be developed proactively in response to a risk assessment or reactively in response to an event that caused injury to a child. Both are valid options in today's climate of terroristic threats to school safety and security. Inaction is not. Schools and other child-centered programs must consider and develop appropriate responses to this new dynamic.

    Risk of personal injury to children is reduced when activities, facilities, equipment, personnel, and supervision are brought into compliance with "standards." There are several sources of standards. Some standards are mandated by law through statutes. Additional standards are set forth by oversight authorities, such as the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Camping Association, the National Federation of High School Athletic Associations, or the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, to name a few. Other standards involve the customary professional practice of those conducting such activities. Ignorance of such standards is no excuse for failing to comply and schools and agencies with children have a duty to be proactive about implementing standards in order to prevent student injury.

    Many school-aged children have medical conditions about which teachers, nurses, and others who are responsible for their health, safety, and well-being should know. If not addressed in the right way by administrators, teachers, or other officials, these conditions can result in a catastrophic incident, not to mention costly litigation. A student with a known heart defect, for instance, is vulnerable in a physical education class if the teacher is not informed of the child's condition and does not institute appropriate precautions or prepared to respond in a medical emergency. If cafeteria personnel in a daycare center know that a child has a peanut allergy but fail to supervise the child appropriately, the child can go into shock if she is allowed to sit at a table where another student is eating peanut butter. In situations like these, if a plan for the child's care was either not in place or developed but not communicated to the staff, the child might suffer irreparable harm - or even die.

    In my profession as an education administration and student supervision expert, I have observed that residential schools and boarding schools present a higher duty than day schools to supervise children and a greater opportunity for the school to be found liable for child abuse and injury. When children are living and learning in a program 24/7, staff must demonstrate not only a professional standard of care, but also a reasonable and prudent parent standard of care. Although related, these standards are distinct and must be appropriately and reasonably applied in a setting where staff serves as surrogate parents and others serve as teachers, counselors, and psychologists. When a child is sexually assaulted, administered unnecessary corporal punishment, or is injured or dies in a residential school, both of these standards need to be addressed.

    The first responsibility of educators and those who supervise children in residential programs, day care centers, before- and after-school programs, and other settings is to make sure that these programs foster learning and care in a safe environment. Asking third graders to move a cart with a heavy TV on top, inadequate staff instruction in safe techniques to quell disruptive students, not carefully checking that the door to the pool closes and locks the way it is supposed to, excessive discipline, playground aides talking among themselves but failing to pay attention to the children, not providing a sufficient number of nighttime supervisors in a dormitory, and a school police officer not trained on how to interact with children with behavioral disorders - any of these circumstances can lead to student injury at school or death of a child and high litigation costs. The overriding professional standard of care is to protect children's health, safety, and well-being. Under this umbrella fall the development and implementation of policies, adequate staff training, and a level of supervision reasonably calculated to keep children safe.

    7/7/2015 · Child Welfare
    In settings where children are supervised by adults, we often think about traditional settings, such as schools and summer camps. But these are not the only places where children participate in activities that require adult supervision and which can result in child injury cases. Some nontraditional settings include resort and vacation day care programs, community recreation centers, church-sponsored events, and Boy and Girl Scout activities, among others.

    For schools, summer camps, and day care centers, one of the key functions of student supervision is to identify dangerous conditions and then either stop the activity or warn of the danger. The supervisor must take appropriate action for the protection of the children. Duty to warn contemplates both having knowledge of danger (actual or constructive notice) and having time to communicate it. Field trip injuries are very common and there is an equal duty to protect when children are off campus but still under school supervision, such as when children are on a school-sponsored trip. Excursions off school property present special challenges. Careful planning ahead of the trip, knowing about potential safety hazards, and creating a plan to avoid or mitigate them can help to protect a child from field trip injuries and a school from liability lawsuits.

    Keeping children safe in schools, preschool and daycare programs, summer camps, on playgrounds, and other locations is a primary responsibility of those who administer such programs. When a child becomes injured and the claim is negligent supervision, a school or other agency will have a greater chance of prevailing when it has clear policies and enforces them. In school premises liability lawsuits plaintiffs are more likely to prevail when a facility fails to maintain its campus and equipment, does not have a regular inspection plan, and does not instruct and supervise students in the safe and appropriate use of equipment.

    Employment decisions in public and private schools should be based on qualifications, performance, merit, and seniority, rather than race, national origin, gender, religion, age, or disability. Teachers and other school personnel can sue for employment discrimination if they are wrongfully dismissed or demoted, if they were prevented from initially obtaining a job, or not appropriately accommodated for a disability or medical condition. Most employment discrimination violates either state or federal law, and legal protections are found in the 14th Amendment to the Constitution and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Additionally, two primary federal statutes prohibit disability discrimination in employment: the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990.

    2/6/2015 · Child Welfare
    When child abuse is alleged to have taken place in a school, daycare facility, preschool program, summer camp, or other entity responsible for the supervision and safety of children, there is always the possibility that the entity may be liable if negligence can be established. Schools and other entities with a duty to protect children often become embroiled in lawsuits alleging that breach of this duty was a proximate cause of a child's injuries. Though laws vary, states adopt a broad definition of child abuse, including physical and emotional abuse, neglect and abandonment, incest, sexual molestation, and sexual exploitation. Typically, a child abuse report must be made to a designated state agency responsible for child protective services when a person, in his or her official capacity, suspects or has reason to believe that a child has been abused or neglected, or knows that a child has been subjected to conditions that could reasonably be expected to result in harm.

    School coaches have a duty to protect athletes from harm, including emotional or physical harm that may result from locker room hazing. High school hazing in athletics has many beginnings - the most prominent being an attitude of superiority among senior athletes and the belief that a weaker or younger athlete must be subjected to harassment to "make the grade" or to be "good enough" to be on the team. This mentality, if left unchecked and if students are allowed to participate in hazing behaviors, eventually can result in even more serious misconduct, such as sexual harassment and serious personal injury.

    When a student personal injury in a public school triggers litigation, plaintiff and defendant attorneys must address the concept of governmental immunity. In general, governmental immunity shields public schools from tort litigation and liability. Governmental immunity is not universally applicable, however, depending on how the facts of a specific case accord with state or provincial laws. This article is about how governmental immunity in public school cases might be pierced and how schools can determine whether governmental immunity applies in school liability cases.

    Millions of children participate in programs operated by daycare centers, nursery schools, and camps across the United States and Canada. The most important aspect of childcare is the safety and supervision of children. When a teacher, recreation leader, camp counselor, or other supervisor is engaged in activities involving young children, there is a duty to protect the child from physical harm, sexual abuse, and other forms of personal injury. A breach of duty to protect the health, safety, and welfare of a child that leads to injury may result in daycare negligence lawsuits.

    In 2011, the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (OCR) issued a "Dear Colleague" letter to college and university administrators about implementation of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 in regards to campus sexual assault cases. Title IX prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs or activities in schools that receive federal funding. The letter explains that schools are required to develop and distribute policies regarding sexual harassment, designate a Title IX coordinator to oversee the school's duties, train staff and students in sexual harassment and violence issues, and establish an investigation procedure and an adjudication process. The letter did not articulate specific procedural safeguards, rules for the examination of evidence, or guidelines for the conduct of adjudication or hearing processes for cases of campus sexual violence.

    Harassment in schools can occur when a student is discriminated against on the basis of national origin, race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, gender, or other identifiable class. A school district may be found liable for harassment if there is no strong, widely disseminated, and consistently enforced policy prohibiting it and no effective complaint procedure is in place. Schools can also be held responsible for the consequences stemming from a failure to take immediate, appropriate steps to respond to a complaint about harassment or bullying, terminate it, and discipline the offending party, be it an employee or another student. When a school has knowledge that a hostile environment exists but does not act on this knowledge, it can be viewed as giving tacit approval to this activity. In such cases, school districts have been found liable for enabling hostile school environment that prevents students from learning.

    The relationship between private schools and their students is very different than the one that exists when a student is in a public school. In private schools, the relationship is contractual in nature. The contract is expressed or implied in written documents, such as promotional literature, student applications, and student and staff handbooks. By contrast, the relationship between public schools and students is governed by federal and state statues, such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Title IX. In public schools, students are afforded constitutional, substantive, and procedural protections that are generally not applicable in a private school. In private schools, academic and conduct issues involving students raise contractual, as opposed to constitutional, issues.

    Injuries are a part of intramural and extramural sports and recreation programs. According to the National Federation of State High School Associations, high school athletes account for 2 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits, and 30,000 hospitalizations each year. There's a certain level of risk assumed by a child who participates in any physical activity, but the school or agency has a general duty to protect children from harm to avoid school sports injury lawsuits. Dereliction of that duty may result in any number of situations that a jury may consider negligent, such as failure to develop and implement appropriate policies and procedures for supervision, poor maintenance of equipment, or inadequate instruction of children about the dangers inherent in their activity.

    Student injury or death often brings negative attention to a school. In fact, the first thing often reported publicly is an injured party's claim that an incident stemmed from the negligence or misconduct of a staff member responsible for a child's safety - a teacher, coach, or bus driver, for instance. But a student injury or death can result from any number of situations. These might range from school-related action or inaction, such as a breach of school security or failure to follow a student's medical orders, to a student's own actions and choices triggering a contributory negligence defense.

    For schools, daycare centers, after-school programs, and camps, children with disabilities often present significant supervisory challenges. If these children's needs are not adequately addressed and a child is seriously injured or killed, negligent supervision may be viewed as a proximate cause. But what constitutes reasonable supervision of children with behavioral or physical disabilities? It depends on the unique needs of the student and a school's standards for protecting that student from harm.

    This article reviews recent legislation and how that legislation effects compliance with student IEPs in regards to the equipment that can improve a student's ability to learn and interact with teachers, family, and friends. The article details the recommendation of devices and the school's responsibility in regards to their procurement, usage, and maintenance.

    Recently, a Seattle student with cerebral palsy was awarded $300,000 in damages from her school after years of harassment by another student was allowed to take place. Her harasser regularly called her names, blocked her wheelchair's path with furniture and manipulated her chair's electronic controls so it rammed into walls. It was not until the harasser caused his target serious physical injury and property damage that school officials responded formatively to his hostility by suspending him for three days.

    Abstract: This special paper introduces the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, describes the school district's obligation to advocate for students with disabilities, reviews student rights created by the law, defines key terms, and takes the reader, step by step, through the procedural protections provided by the regulations.

    Abstract: Examples of consultations serve as an illustration of how a consulting education expert can assist lawyers who are working on school and education related cases. One example deals with a special education dispute involving inclusion and the other deals with liability for student injury and a settlement of $850,000.

    The tragic realities of the school killings in Littleton, Colorado, and similar instances of violence involving today's youth, have educators, policymakers and communities searching for causes as well as methods of prevention. Hit lists, posted on Internet sites and plans made by high school students to "get even" when they are teased are symptoms of what we already know: Bullying, teasing and discrimination are big problems for American children.

    Our nation's schools pay millions of dollars annually in damages to school children injured in class, sexually assaulted by teachers, and harassed by fellow students. Unnecessary risks in schools can be controlled to protect the safety of students, faculty and support staffs and to eliminate costly litigation and settlements.

    Even the most amicable custody arrangements can sour over school choice. As more people move about, the issue of where their children will attend school, and what that school offers compared to their current situation, is becoming more significant in family law. This article examines ways an education expert can assist with objective evaluations of school programs.

    The educator as a consulting and testifying expert has become one of the most important tools that an lawyer can use in the dispute resolution process involving schools. When the consultant becomes an expert witness the relationship changes. This article explains how the expert educator assesses merits of a case, and provides consultation to lawyers who are working on education and school related cases.

    6/19/2013 · Expert Witnessing
    According to a new national survey, there has been a sharp drop in the percentage of America's children being physically bullied or beaten up by their peers.

    5/13/2013 · Expert Witnessing
    Assigning fault and responsibility in a lawsuit involving a school is rarely clear cut.

    3/25/2013 · Expert Witnessing
    Eyewitnesses to the event may only tell what they saw, heard, felt or smelled; they are not allowed to tell what others have said (hearsay) or say what they think of the case.

    The first wave of inclusion has crashed upon the shores of our schools. Now, educators and parents are looking toward the horizon awaiting the next wave to see what it brings.

    Now that the administrative law judge ordered Heather into the regular fourth-grade classroom, none of the teachers want to have her, Maybe we shouldn't have filed for a due process hearing against the school. I think it backfired on us.

    Schools seem to have little control over the financial and human resources that are dedicated to special education. How can accountability be achieved?

    This article explores common situations regarding sexual harassment in the school setting. It also discusses exploitation of sexual power either by teachers or by students in an inappropriate relationship. Schools and its employees have a duty to train their students on their sexual harassment policies and to report any inappropriate behavior.

    5/14/2012 · Social Issues
    Cyberbullying is one of the fastest-growing problems facing families and the people responsible for protecting our children: school administrators, lawmakers and law enforcement officials. Cyberbullying is such a new frontier, the laws that define and police it are, in many places, weak to nonexistent. Its "sudden" pervasiveness and severity is now shocking people into action as evidenced by the rash of suicides making national news and the resulting public outcry.

    The safety of children is of the utmost concern to school board members, administrators, and teachers. Accidents do happen, of course, but you must do everything you can to make sure that the students in your care are not hurt.

    People who are passionate about school safety have a vision--a vision we share with concerned parents, educators, and especially with the kids we're obliged to protect.

    All 15-year-old Phoebe Prince wanted was to be liked. But after moving from Ireland to Massachusetts, it wasn't long before Phoebe endured bullying from the "mean girls" at school.

    It is commonly accepted that school liability has increased over the past several years, especially in the area of tort liability.

    Edward F. Dragan EdD
    Bullying used to be thought of as an unpleasant rite of passage, but now psychologists are realizing that it inflicts real harm. As many as 40 percent of children report that they’ve experienced episodes of bullying at school or online through their school community. School safety expert Edward Dragan argues that parents need to be proactive in looking out for their children’s social well being at school. From his many decades as a Board of Education insider, he argues that schools are self-protective entities and reluctant to address bullying themselves.
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    Dr. Palmer Morrel-Samuels
    210 Park Street
    Chelsea MI 48118
    USA
    phone: (734) 368-3348
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    Dr. Palmer Morrel-Samuels is a Research Psychologist with extensive training and experience in Statistical Analysis and Assessment Design. He has done a considerable amount of research and applied work on communication, testified to the U.S. congress on employee motivation and its linkage to objective performance metrics, published several articles on survey design in Harvard Business Review, among others, and wrote several patents to assist in the administration and analysis of workplace assessments. Dr. Morrel-Samuels currently teaches graduate courses on survey design and research methodology at the University of Michigan.

    Litigation Services: Dr. Morrel-Samuels' education, practical experience, and distinguished authorship have made him a valuable resource for providing expert services in legal cases where workplace surveys or assessments are at issue, including:
    • Statistical analysis of very large datasets, measuring the impact of corporate culture on performance and race discrimination.

    • Analysis of a survey's validity, reliability, objectivity, fairness, accuracy, confidentiality, freedom from response bias, and conformance to The Uniform Guidelines pertaining to all workplace assessments.

    • Statistical analyses of performance-related and survey-related data.

    • Desiging and conducting employee and workplace surveys, including Electronic surveys.

    • Disparate Impact & Disparate Treatment litigation.

    • Careful job analysis using court-approved methodology in FLSA litigation.

    • Performance appraisals, job evaluations, skill assessments.

    • Program evaluations, especially when used in hiring, firing, or other job actions.
    Expert Witness Experience, includes: Assisted the NAACP in its amicus brief for the Ricci discrimination case. Was the sole statistician in a successful $100M breach of contract case (Tower Automotive v. UNOVA) that required analyzing 4 million rows of data. Testified for the ICC’s International Court of Arbitration in The Hague. Has successfully withstood Daubert challenges - most recently from the City of Indianapolis in a large discrimination case involving the city's fire department.

    View Consulting Profile.
    This paper outlines a number of innovations that we have recently implemented in the Research Methodology Course at the University of Michigan's School of Public Health.

    3/29/2013 · Surveys
    THERE'S NO DOUBT that companies can benefit from workplace surveys and questionnaires. A GTE survey in the mid-1990s, for example} revealed that the performance of its different billing operations, as measured by the accuracy of bills sent out, was closely tied to the leadership style of the unit managers.

    This might come as a shock: Employees in large corporations sometimes mistakenly believe that they have been discriminated against. Admittedly, discrimination does occur, both in society and in the workplace. And as most attorneys know, many discrimination cases concern claims of either adverse treatment or adverse impact.

    Effective evidence-based managelnent requires analyzing data from a broad array of sources and conducting carefully designed pretest-posttest comparisons. However, our experience suggests that few businesses take that process to the next level by building merged datasets that can be used for rigorous pretest-posttest comparisons and meaningful statistical analyses.

    10/10/2012 · Surveys
    Companies are replacing paper surveys with Web-based versions that can dangerously distort the results.

    No contemporary guide exists for using statistics to prove causality in court. We outline a new theory explaining comprehension of causal graphs, and claim four hallmarks of causality are critical: Association, Prediction, Exclusion of Alternative Explanations, and Dose Dependence.

    4/23/2012 · Social Issues
    We distinguish between reverse discrimination and over-correction, arguing that the former should be used only to describe cases where well-qualified non-minority applicants are unjustifiably denied positions in organizations run by and/or staffed by minorities. Similarly, we argue over-correction should be used to describe well-qualified non-minority applicants who are unjustifiably denied positions in organizations run by non-minorities.

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    Forensic Psychology
    2430 Estancia Blvd. Ste 203
    Clearwater Florida (FL) 33761
    USA
    phone: 727-786-0600
    fax: 727-786-0677
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    Dr. Robert Evans, PhD,  is a Licensed School Psychologist with over 30 years of experience in the behavioral sciences, including completing over 100 Child Custody Evaluations. Dr. Evans serves as a consultant to the medical, legal, and law enforcement community in Florida on Psychological and Educational matters. He consulted with Orange County Public Defender with cases involving arrest and incarceration of children, including Competency Assessments and Insanity Determinations. He has also provided Critical Incident Stress Debriefings to victims of crime in the Central Florida area. 

    Litigation Support - Dr. Evans specializes in Parental Alienation cases which are commonly among those classified as High Conflict Divorce cases and he has written a book on Parental Alienation. He provides litigation support to counsel for both Plaintiff and Defense. His services include support with hearing / trial preparations, review of current evaluations, and support during and after the litigation process. 

    Dr. Evans has given sworn testimony as a Forensic Psychology expert witness in NY, IL, PA, GA, FL, IA, ID, CO, OH, TX, TN, LA, MA, MD, MO, NC, SC, WA, and OR. 

    Areas of Expertise:

    • Parental Alienation
    • Child Custody Evaluations
    • False Allegations of Abuse
    • Treatment Considerations for Alienated Children
    • Workplace Violence
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    Psychology / Neuropsychology Consultant
    555 Front Street Unit 1403
    San Diego CA 92101
    USA
    phone: 917-687-0271
    Bonny-Forrest-Psychology-Expert-Photo.jpg
    Bonny Forrest, JD, PhD is a Psychologist and Attorney with specialized training in Neuropsychology, with an emphasis on cognitive, intellectual, and social-emotional development and disabilities. With 25 years of experience, her specialty certifications are numerous, including infant preschool mental health, and a variety of evidence-based treatments.

    Having practiced law for a decade in major national firms, Dr. Forrest supervised complex litigations, including death-penalty cases. As a psychologist, she has testified successfully both in court and in depositions (including surviving a Daubert challenge and testifying for eight days in Federal court), and has been appointed as a parent coordinator by the court in high-conflict divorce proceedings.

    Dr. Forrest has represented a number of children and families in IEP meetings and related proceedings. She was one of the first mental health experts to be certified at the highest level in the state of California as a “mentor” in working with children under the age of six.

    Dr. Forrest is a very active member of a number of professional organizations and non-profits, serving in a number of leadership positions, including the following: American Psychological Association, National Academy of Neuropsychology, San Diego Psychological Association, and the Immigration Justice Project of the American Bar Association. She is licensed to practice in California and New York but has traveled for work where appropriate under local law.

    Areas of Focus
    • Risk of Institutionalization
    • Child Psychology
    • Autism
    • IEP
    • Parent Coordination
    • Brain Development
    • Developmental Disabilities
  • Cognition
  • Child Development
  • Infant Preschool Mental Health
  • Law and Psychology
  • Death Penalty
  • High-conflict Parenting
  • Criminal Defense
  • Education - Education: PhD, Psychology/Pediatric Neuropsychology, Columbia University; JD, Indiana University; BA, Criminal Justice/Sociology, Purdue University

    View Dr. Forrest's Consulting Profile.
    Bonny J. Forrest, JD, PhD
    Helping parents determine whether their child's behavior is typical for the age or, possibly, a sign of something more serious they should look into, this book uses lay terms and concrete examples to aid adults in establishing if their child may have a commonly diagnosed issue such as ADHD, depression, a learning disability, and others; where to go to get help; how to get support from schools and the medical community; and what questions to ask along the way. Each chapter expands on a specific set of behaviors that may be problematic by listing types of problems, possible diagnoses, the types of treatments that have been found to be effective, discussions of the pros and cons of alternative treatments, and typical medications.
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    Dr. Pogos H. Voskanian
    Medical Director
    1240 Serota Place
    Philadelphia PA 19115
    USA
    phone: 215-938-7227
    fax: 215-938-7474
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    Expertise: Specializing in applications of clinical psychiatry to legal issues in civil and criminal matters at the interface of Psychiatry and the Law. Has served as an evaluator or expert witness in about three hundred cases in State and Federal courts in matters relating to:
    • Mental State at Time-of-the-Offense Evaluations
    • Insanity Defense / Diminished Capacity
    • Civil & Criminal Competency Evaluations
    • Competency to Stand Trial / Competency to Waive Miranda Rights
    • Testamentary Capacity / Testimonial Capacity / Informed Consent
    • Capital Sentencing & Mitigation
    • Risk of Violence Assessments
    • Sex Offenders
    • Sexual Harassment
    • Worker's Compensation
  • Independent Medical Evaluations / Psychiatric Disability
  • Personal Injury / Pain & Suffering / Emotional Distress
  • Workplace Violence Assessments
  • Discrimination
  • Evaluations under Americans With Disabilities Act
  • Fitness for Duty
  • Psychiatric Malpractice
  • Toxic Tort
  • Product Liability

  • Professional Background: Certified by ABPN in Psychiatry and Forensic Psychiatry. Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Director of Psychiatry and Law Program at MCP Hahanemann University. Director of Psychiatry & Law Program and Director of Correctional Mental Health Services Program/Provider of Mental Health Services for the City of Philadelphia Prison System. Formerly Director of Psychiatry & Law Program at the Medical College of Virginia. M.D. Degree -University of Massachusetts. Psychiatry Residency & Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship -Tulane University Medical Center.
    Wills are generally contested either on the grounds that the testator lacked Testamentary Capacity (was incompetent to make a will at the time of signing it) or the testator, because of his/her mental state, was subject to Undue Influence (i.e. if there is evidence of coercion, manipulation, deception, compulsion, intimidation, etc.) or an Undue Influence secondary to a thought disturbance (such as delusions affecting the testator's free will in making decisions).

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    Alexander E. Obolsky, MD, DFAPA
    Licensed in the states of IL, WI, and NV
    134 N. LaSalle, Ste. 1810
    Chicago IL 60602
    USA
    phone: 312-456-4343
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    Alexander Obolsky Forensic Psychiatry Expert PhotoAlexander E. Obolsky, MD, DFAPA, is board-certified and trained in General, Addiction, and Forensic Psychiatry. He possesses over 20 years of experience evaluating and treating patients in the Chicagoland area.

    Dr. Obolsky has extensive training, experience, and understanding of medical and psychiatric illness, medical-psychiatric assessment, and various forms of mental health treatment. He can analyze and diagnose medical issues potentially presenting as non psychiatric symptoms. As a physician, Dr. Obolsky has also been trained in the field of Pharmacology both within and outside of General Adult Psychiatry. He has evaluated and treated patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), and other psychiatric and neurobehavioral disorders.

    Dr. Obolsky's professional achievements include having established and ran The Division of Forensic Psychiatry at the Northwestern University Medical School and The Psychiatry and Law Program at Northwestern Medical Faculty Foundation. He worked as an Assistant Medical Director at the Illinois largest hospital for criminally insane. He has been featured in the “America’s Top Psychiatrists” guide multiple times in the areas of conflict, stress, and trauma.

    Litigation Support - Dr. Obolsky's forensic practice is focused on evaluation of mental, emotional, and cognitive functioning, ascertaining current and past competencies for variety of life and work activities and functions, and identifying causation for mental conditions and functional deficits. He addresses such legal issues as fitness and competency in a variety of settings, e.g., ascertaining level of impairment for a particular function (fitness for duty), disability, and mental state at the time of the offense (NGRI), among other competencies.

    Uniquely qualified to consult in will contest cases, Dr. Obolsky takes into account the effects of physical injuries, illnesses, location (e.g., ICU, nursing home, isolation), and medications on individuals' testamentary capacity and ability to withstand undue influence. Past cases have included personal injury, probate, workers' compensation, and criminal law. He also works with corporate occupational health and HR departments.

    Areas of Expertise:
    • PTSD
    • Traumatic Brain Injury
    • Pain / Suffering
    • Depression
    • Chronic Pain
    • Toxicity
    • Burns
    • Neuropsychiatry
    • Medical Malpractice
    • Personal Injury
  • Impairment
  • Insanity
  • Fitness for Duty
  • Malingering
  • Workers Compensation
  • Sexual Harassment
  • Disability
  • Discrimination
  • Competency
  • Addiction Psychiatry
  • View Dr. Obolsky's Consulting Profile.
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    Charles H. Heller, PhD
    Addresses Below
    NY, NJ USA
    phone: 212-880-3789 - Alternate Numbers Below
    Charles-Heller-Forensic-Psychologist-Logo.jpg
    Charles Heller Forensic Psychology Expert PhotoCharles H. Heller, PhD, is a Forensic Psychology Expert with over 35 years of experience in his field. Dr. Heller is currently on staff at Rutgers University Biomedical Health service, specializing in criminal behavior and risk assessment. He also serves as a forensic psychologist consultant for the Rockland County (NY) court evaluation service, where he has performed hundreds of child custody, as well as criminal competency and child abuse/neglect evaluations.

    Litigation Support - Dr. Heller specializes in conducting custody evaluations, providing the review and analysis of potentially mitigating circumstances in connection with criminal behavior, and providing consultation to attorneys regarding civil litigation. He has extensive court experience in Civil, Criminal, and Family Court cases.

    Dr. Heller is a fully vetted and approved forensic psychologist for the NJ Office of the Public Defender as well as other Public Defender offices. (Federal Public Defender, Legal Aid in Manhattan, Bronx, Kings and the NYC assigned counsel program). He often travels throughout the US as a forensic consultant in important court cases including military Court Martials, death row assessment, sexual abuse, assault and multiple homicides. He is well known and respected among his colleagues as a clinician and as a forensic psychologist/expert witness.

    Civil Litigation - (Emotional and Mental Injury) - Dr. Heller is retained by both plaintiff and defense counsel to assess plaintiffs for emotional and mental injury. He takes an unbiased, ethical approach to assessments and is not "a hired gun." He is an expert in objective evaluations that assess the probability the plaintiff is suffering PTSD, other emotional injuries, or if there is exaggeration of symptoms based upon psychological testing and other data. He has expertise in cases that involve group home / residential schools, provider negligence, and assaults.

    Criminal Litigation - Dr. Heller is experienced in providing successful rebuttal testimony explaining the scientific issues related to the problems of validity, reliability, and usefulness of "Syndrome evidence" such as "Child Sexual Abuse Accommodation Syndrome" and "Rape Trauma Syndrome." He testifies in child sexual abuse cases and explains research related to false allegations, recantations, memory, suggestibility, child testimony, interview protocols, and "Believed-In Imaginings" in children and adults. He has expertise in domestic violence and has assessed women who have been victims of intimate partner violence and "Battered Women Syndrome" that contributed to homicides, assaults, and other felonies by the victims of abuse.

    Manhattan: (Mailing Address)
    275 Madison Ave., 6th Floor
    New York, NY 10016
    Phone: 212-880-3789 - Alt. Phone: 845-354-0535
    Fax: 845-354-1287
    New Jersey: (Alternate Mailing Address)
    140 East Ridgewood Avenue
    South Tower, Suite 415
    Paramus, NJ 07652
    Phone: 201-262-0331
    Fax: 845-354-1287
    Orange County: (Not for Mail Service)
    673 RT. 17M
    Monroe, NY 10950
    Phone: 845-354-0535
    Fax: 845-354-1287
    Westchester County: (Not for Mail Service)
    520 White Plains Road, Suite 500
    Tarrytown, NY 10591
    Phone: 845-354-0535
    Fax: 845-354-1287


    View Dr. Heller's Consulting Profile.
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    M.D., M.P.H.
    204 South Beverly Drive,Suite 108
    Beverly Hills CA 90212
    USA
    phone: 310-278-5433
    carole_lieberman_photo.jpg
    Dr. Carole Lieberman, MD, MPH, Psychiatrist and Expert Witness, is a Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, and a well-respected member of the clinical faculty at UCLA's Neuropsychiatric Institute. Awarded an NIMH grant, for research in how to use the media for public health education, Dr. Lieberman also has a Masters Degree in Public Health.

    Prior Cases:
  • Terri Schiavo (appeal)
  • Nevada v. Floyd Mayweather (domestic violence)
  • People v. Jonathan Schmitz (Jenny Jones Talk Show Murder Trial)
  • Tate v. Larry Johnson/Stacey Augman (assault and paternity)
  • Roseanne Barr v. Tom Arnold
  • Jim Carrey Divorce
  • Jean Claude Van Damme Divorce
  • Reifschneider v. UC Regents (UCLA), Nicol (sexual harassment)
  • Jasmer v. Geraldo (emotional distress)
  • Areas of Expertise:
  • High Profile
  • Criminal
  • Sexual Harassment
  • Entertainment Law
  • Media-Incited Copycat Behavior
  • Psychiatric and HMO Malpractice
  • Divorce
  • Custody
  • Abuse (sexual, physical, emotional)
  • Wrongful Termination
  • Discrimination
  • Equestrian and other Sports
  • Personal Injury
  • Terrorism
  • Violence
  • Priest Misconduct
  • Police Misconduct
  • Workers Compensation (QME/IME/AME)
  • Dr. Lieberman has provided Congressional Testimony on several occasions. She is also a Trial Analyst of high profile trials in the media, including cases such as Michael Jackson, Scott Peterson, Terri Schiavo,Kobe Bryant, the BTK killer and Robert Blake, for Court TV, Fox News, CNN, the Today Show, Good Morning America and many other media outlets.

    Dr. Lieberman is also a bestselling author. She is the author of Coping With Terrorism: Dreams Interrupted and Bad Boys: Why We Love Them, How to Live with Them and When to Leave Them (Dutton/Signet).. And she is finishing Murder By TV… a Descent Into Madness, a first-person account of the Jenny Jones Talk Show Murder Trial, where she testified as the psychiatric expert witness for the defense.

    For more information about Dr. Lieberman's media experience, please visit her website: http://www.drcarole.com.
    1/6/2012 · Psychiatry
    Once upon a time, there was a shark...I mean a lawyer...who loved to chew up the opposition. One day, he stopped in mid-chew and asked himself, "Why?" Was it to make his client happy? To make a lot of money? To make sure justice was upheld? Yes, it was all of these, but he couldn't help feeling there was more.

    Carole Lieberman, MD, MPH
    Why do millions of smart, savvy, successful men fall helplessly in love with women who are destined to break their hearts? Who are these "Bad Girls," poised to pounce o the next nice guy just waiting to become their prey? And ho can good girls learn to become man-magnets without becoming 'bad'? This book is a no-holds barred, provocative look at the dangerous damsels who steal the hearts of men everywhere. They take what they want---money, sex, drugs, or other objects of desire---and leave these unsuspecting men in the dust.
    Carole Lieberman, MD, MPH
    This book guides the reader along a healing journey, to mend dreams that have been interrupted by terrorism: both our daydreams of cherished aspirations and our night dreams now clouded by nightmares. It begins with "The Terrorist Stress Test", opening the door for the reader to self-identify symptoms he had not yet connected to the surreptitious influence of terrorism….
    Carole Lieberman, Lisa Collier Cool
    Based on metaphors found in popular culture and fairy tales, this book is a practical, entertaining guide to the twelve male personality types collectivelyperceived as "bad boys." Includes detailed profiles of particular "bad boy" types and analyzes behavior patterns. Also advises women who are romantically involved with these types on how to save the relationship, or when to leave it.
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    Michael Perrotti
    PhD
    Three Pointe Drive Suite 303
    Brea CA 92821
    USA
    phone: 714-528-0100
    fax: 714-528-2575
    michael_perrotti_logo.jpg
    Dr. Michael PerrottiDr. Michael J. Perrotti, Ph.D, a member of the National Academy of Neuropsychology, specializes in Clinical and Forensic Psychology. He has over 30 years of experience with consumers, courts, and counsel including civil, prosecution, defense counsel, family court and the US Government. Dr. Perrotti contributes to the profession as an Expert Witness for the State of California Department of Consumer Affairs, Enforcement Division, Board of Behavioral Science Examiners and is a government expert on disability for the Social Security Administration, Office of Hearings & Appeals as well as the US Department of Health & Human Services. Dr. Perrotti was an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Science at the Keck School of Medicine, USC (2005-2006).

    Dr. Perrotti possesses specialized training and expertise in the area of Assessment of Sexual Deviation and Evaluation of Child Sexual Abuse Allegations. His training, experience and use of the Abel Assessment of Sexual Interest Computerized Test from the Abel Center in Atlanta, Georgia, enables him to add a state-of-the-art sophisticated tool for the evaluation of sexual offending.

    Dr. Perrotti was appointed a government expert for the Office of Hearings and Appeals for the Social Security Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services. He has been a Expert Consultant on T.V. shows such as CSI: Crime Scene Investigations, Numbers, and Vanished. Dr. Perrotti is a part of a cadre of psychologists who assisted the San Bernardino Juvenile Court with the establishment of risk factors and protocols for the evaluation of juvenile sex offenders. Dr. Perrotti is a member of the Orange County Sheriff's Reserve, Professional Services Division.

    Services Include:
  • Neuropsycholgical Assessment
  • Sanity / Competency to Stand Trial Assessment
  • Police Misconduct
  • Suggestibility Testing
  • Crime Scene Investigation in Report Formulation
  • Sexual Predator Determination
  • Effects of Psychotropic Medications on Confession
  • Expert Neuropsychologist in Sexual Assault Trial
  • Disability Determination for Social Security Office of Hearings & Appeals
  • Expert in Bonding Studies and False Confessions
  • PTSD (acute and complex) in General, Law Enforcement, and Iraq War Veterans
  • Panic Disorders and Phobias
  • Custody Evaluation
  • Severe Trauma in Children, Adolescents, and Adults
  • False Confessions
  • 4/9/2018 · Neuropsychology
    One is frequently presented with an individual who presents for evaluation as a result of traumatic events such as sexual harassment, sexual abuse in the school and workplace, electrical injury, and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Voir dire of experts as to credentials and experience needs to be viewed as only one aspect of the vetting process of forensic work product. Experts, as much as anyone else, are prone to conscious and unconscious sources of bias. This rather significant problem area in forensic reports is discussed by (Stuld and Simon, 2013) under the rubric of heuristic and cognitive biases. Heuristics addresses how people arrive at decisions or reach conclusions in complex family law, civil, or criminal matters. Errors in this area are of concern when experts focus or overly attend to only a part of the problem or afford overemphasis to certain factors and minimize the contribution of other factors. One can also see this problem in medicine. A patient may complain of pain in a particular body region whereas the provider focuses only another medical issue.

    Defense counsel is frequently presented with the problem of a client protesting their innocence and accusers, perhaps multiple accusers, leveling allegations of sexual assault against the client. Of course, with defendants facing severe legal consequences, complaints need to be evaluated as to their reliability and validity.

    8/8/2017 · Psychology
    Proper interviewing Protocols are critical to maximize information-gathering as well as accuracy of information in criminal and National Security investigations. Police procedures incorrectly assume that promoting physical close proximity with an interviewer (eg, Inbau, Reid, Buckley, & Jane, 2013) will induce subjects to become more forthcoming.

    8/16/2016 · Psychology
    Unlike in Alzheimer's Disease, neurofibrillary tangles in athletes with CTE tend to accumulate perivascularly within the superficial neocortical layers. It is interesting to note that TAU pathology in CTE is partially and extensively distributed, possible related to multi-directional mechanical force from physical trauma (McKee et al, 2009; Neuropath Exp Neurol 68, 709-35.) It is theorized that accumulation of hyperphosphor is related to a protein that is thought to result in development of CTE and associated neurobehavioral disturbances.

    6/21/2016 · Psychology
    Just this month, an article appeared in the Journal of Neuropsychology entitled "Early Onset Marijuana Use is Associated with Learning Inefficiencies." Young adults reporting early onset marijuana use have learning weaknesses, which accounted for the association between early onset marijuana use and delayed recall.

    1/19/2016 · Psychology
    The recent editors of Myers on Evidence of Interpersonal Violence (Myers 2016) notes that the most well-known of psychological instruments to assess suggestibility is the Gudjohnson Suggestibility Scales (GSS). The GSS is utilized by psychologists to evaluate whether defendant's confessions were voluntary. The author notes that it is doubtful that these instruments are sufficiently reliable for use in legal proceedings. It is noted that in Shanklin, 379 111 Dec 211 the trial judge did not err in subjecting the GSS to a Frye Henry.

    11/6/2015 · Psychology
    Does the availability of weapons lead to violence? Citizens certainly have a right to bear arms and defend themselves. However, what does the science say about this area?

    10/19/2015 · Neuropsychology
    The public understanding of TBI is so poor that it is officially referred to by the US National Center for Injury Prevention and Control as "the silent epidemic." In the acute phase, the usual radiological examinations are not sensitive to TBI and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). There is a significant amount of false negatives with CT scans administered in the ER.

    9/22/2015 · Neuropsychology
    The author recently had a chapter accepted for publication on Methodology for Conducting Bonding Studies in Child Custody Evaluations (CCE). This chapter was written in response to the requests of many psychologists over the years who wanted guidance in procedures for conducting bonding studies. Many psychologists conduct bonding studies with cursory observations of parent and child. There is no application of an objective scoring system or any methods that can be replicated by other CCE Evaluators. This is essential in science.

    8/20/2015 · Neuropsychology
    This week marked the enshrinement of Junior Seau in the NFL Hall of Fame. Junior was an outstanding linebacker for USC who went onto great accomplishments in the NFL. However, all was not well. The effects of domestic violence, substance abuse and gambling difficulties; as reported on ESPN's Outside the Lines, took the toll on Junior. He repeatedly complained to a friend who was a fellow player and suffered from headaches, how he too, suffered for years from headaches. ESPN noted that he was reported to have been diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a neuro-degenerative disease that can lead to dementia, memory loss and depression. Gina Seau reported that Junior's disease was associated with head-to-head collisions caused from 20 years of playing in the NFL. This scenario affected his ability to think logically.

    11/20/2013 · Psychology
    To determine if there are any changes in self-concept, locus of control and frequency of aggressive behaviors in juvenile offenders. As a function of receiving Direct Decision Therapy (DDT). Sub-objectives are whether DDT will effect positive change in self-concept, higher interval control and significantly fewer aggressive behaviors.

    7/17/2013 · Brain Injury
    Recently the examination of the brain of Junior Seau revealed the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. The recent diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) after examination of the brain of Junior Seau underlines the seriousness not only of repetitive brain trauma in professional sports and in military populations but also raises continuing serious questions about the management and prevention of CTE in athletic sports.

    6/26/2013 · Psychology
    Prosecutors and law enforcement are frequently confronted with situations wherein children have been traumatized and/or injured. These injuries have resulted in disabilities which affect the child’s ability to understand questions as well as express answers to questions.

    It is a matter of utmost importance that an even playing field be created in adversarial proceedings. What is conducive to this is use of forensic guidelines as standards by all experts involved in a case.

    4/18/2013 · Psychology
    There has been great voiced concern by practitioners and researchers over overcategorization and overgeneralization of individuals accused of sexual offending being lumped into one category of "sexual predators." Whereas there certainly is a need for protection of children from predators in our society, the pendulum has swung too far to the extreme.

    3/18/2013 · Psychology
    Recently the Oregon Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision, upended how eyewitness identification is to be used in criminal trials. The article in The New York Times (2012) indicated that misidentification is the country's leading cause of wrongful conviction.

    2/4/2013 · Psychology
    The issue of children's memory is contentious. Some individuals assert that if a child says something, therefore it must be true. However, the research shows that this certainly is not the case. Human memory is not an exact recording of an event(s).

    11/15/2012 · Psychology
    All too often one sees survivors of abuse all categorized under the rubric of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As Herman, in a paper on complex PTSD, notes (1992), PTSD formulation fails to capture the sequelae, acuity, and severity of prolonged, repeated trauma.

    11/15/2012 · Brain Injury
    Freeman et al. (2005) noted that it was in the mid-'80s when it was first noted that mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) could result in serious and lasting consequences. Numerous studies with human and animal subjects have demonstrated the evidence of neurocognitive defects and delayed return to work in MTBI patients with postconcussive syndrome.

    10/4/2012 · Psychology
    The recent death by suicide of Junior Seau of the San Diego Chargers is only one of many suicides in the NFL. O.J. Murdock, a 25-year-old wide receiver for the Tennessee Titans, died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

    Recent cases have come to the fore concerning faulty eyewitness ID raising increasing and continuing concern about the error rate of eyewitness ID. This concern dates all the way back to Janet Reno, Attorney General, who appointed a committee of mentalhealth professionals and attorney to evaluate the area of eyewitness ID.

    6/21/2012 · Neuropsychology
    The United States is seeing more and more young men returning from Afghanistan and Iraq with horrendous results in terms of family integration, societal integration, and domestic violence. Some of these individuals, according to Cernak, are found on the battlefield dead with no marks whatsoever on them.

    The problem of false confession is alarming. Just after publication by Barry Scheck in his text on and his writings on DNA and establishment of the Innocence Project, he found 77 wrongful convictions and individuals wrongfully imprisoned in California.

    2/3/2012 · Psychology
    Police departments across the United States are routinely questioning young children concerning child sexual abuse allegations. Frequently the police are untrained in the correct techniques to utilize for investigating interview of the children.

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    Marcel O. Ponton, PhD
    2 N. Lake Ave, Ste. 800
    Pasadena CA 91101
    USA
    phone: 626-449-2484
    fax: 626-449-1107
    Marcel-Ponton-Neuropsychology-Expert-Photo.jpg
    Marcel O. Ponton, PhD, has over 25 years of experience in the field of Psychology. He specializes in the Neuropsychological Assessment and treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury patients and patients with Psychological Trauma.

    Dr. Ponton continues to treat brain injury and trauma survivors in his private practice. He has extensive expertise in the assessment of Spanish-speaking patients. He is a published author, Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at UCLA, and Adjunct Professor of Pastoral Counseling at Fuller Theological Seminary.

    Litigation Support - Over the past 22 years he has served as an expert witness, Dr. Ponton has executed hundreds of evaluations and been retained for his expertise over 300 times. He has testified as an expert in court or before an arbitrator over 40 times. Dr. Ponton's services include neuropsychological assessments, psychological assessments, report writing, medical records review, consulting, and assessment of children and adults.

    Areas of Expertise:
    • Forensic Neuropsychology
    • Traumatic Brain Injury
    • Brain Injury Rehabilitation
    • Spinal Cord Injury
    • Trauma
    • Malingering
    • Personal Injury
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Psychology
  • Dementia
  • Sanity / Trial Competency
  • Sexual Harassment
  • Sexual Discrimination
  • Handedness
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    Steven Gaskell
    2135 City Gate Lane,Suite 300
    Naperville IL 60563
    USA
    phone: 630-903-9193
    steven_gaskell_photo.jpg

    Steven Gaskell, Psy.D. is a Forensic Psychologist, license eligible in all 50 states. He has years of extensive experience providing a variety of Forensic Psychological Evaluations and testifying regarding a variety of legal issues. Dr. Gaskell has completed more than 2000 Forensic Psychological Assessments including over 600 pre-trial Competency to Stand Trial or Fitness to Stand Trial and Criminal Responsibility (Insanity Defense) psychological evaluations and he has provided expert testimony these issues on numerous occasions. Competency to Stand Trial/ Fitness to Stand Trial Criminal Responsibility or Sanity at the Time of the Offense Mitigating Factors Assessment Miranda Rights Issues (voluntariness, competency to confess, interrogative suggestibility) Malingering and Deception Sexual Assault Allegations Sex Offender Evaluations Sexually Violent Person Evaluations Pedophilia Paraphilias Future Likelihood of Sexual Re-Offense

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