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Forensic Engineering Expert Witnesses Warren Forensic Engineers

Matthew Warren
Main Contact
Mail: PO Box 1608
Visit: 7805 Saint Andrews Road
Irmo SC 29063
USA
phone: 888- 827-7823 / 803-732-6600
fax: 803-732-7576
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Warren Forensic Engineers and Consultants, founded in 1997, is extremely well versed in the disciplines of Mechanical, Electrical, Chemical, Structural, and Fire and Explosion investigation. Their engineers are known for delivering the truth — origin, cause, responsibility, and cost of an event or claim — with unmistakable clarity. Warren Forensics provides technical investigations and analyses of personal injury and property claims as well as expert testimony for insurance adjusters and attorneys. Each member of their engineering team is a licensed professional engineer (P.E.) in multiple states. Beyond engineering expertise, their engineers and consultants also hold a variety of other certifications including Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator, Certified Vehicle Fire Investigator, Certified Fire Investigation Instructor, CMSE®-Certified Machine Safety Expert, Certified Safety Professional, Certified Building Inspector, and Certified Property and Evidence Specialist. 

Types of Loss:

  • Chemical: Ammonia - Confined Space - OSHA
  • Collision: Animal - ATV - Automotive - Bicycle - Farm Equipment - Motorcycle - Pedestrian - Truck
  • Commercial: Construction Defects - Construction Related Losses - Electrical and Control Systems - Liability Claims - Lightning Damage - Mechanical Systems - Roofing - Slip, Trip and Fall - Structural - Water Damage - Workplace Injuries
  • Fires and Explosions: Boiler - Commercial - CSST - Dust Explosions - Electrical - Fire Protection Systems - Industrial - LP and Natural Gas - Machinery and Equipment - Marine - Residential - Spontaneous Combustion - Structural - Vehicle and Mobile Equipment - Welding and Hot Work
  • Industrial: Boilers and Pressure Vessels - Construction Defects - Construction Related Losses - Cranes, Hoists, Lifting and Rigging - Electrical and Control Systems - Industrial Process Equipment - Liability Claims - Lightning Damage - Machinery and Equipment - Material Handling - Mechanical Systems - Roofing - Slip, Trip and Fall - Structural - Water Damage - Workplace Injuries
  • Inland and Ocean: Boilers and Pressure Vessels - Bulk Material Handling - Cargo Damage Assessment - Cargo Handling - Cranes, Hoists, Lifting and Rigging - Docks and Piers - Machinery and Equipment - Marinas - Marine Collisions - Marine Fire Protection Systems - Marine Liability Analysis - Mechanical and Electrical Systems - Slip, Trip and Fall - Workplace Injuries
  • Residential: Construction Defects - Construction Related Losses - Electrical Systems - Lightning Damage - Mechanical Systems - Roofing - Slip, Trip and Fall - Structural - Water Damage
  • Subrogation: Consumer Products - Electrical - Fire and Explosions - Machinery and Equipment - Workers’ Compensation
  • Catastrophic: Earthquake - Flood - Freeze, Ice and Snow - Hail Storm - Hurricane - Tornado - Wildfire - Wind Storm and Wind Shear

Featured Experts:

7/17/2018
Event Data Recorders (EDRs) were first introduced by General Motors (GM) in 1974. That data was only available to GM; however, since 1994 more and more vehicle EDR’s have recorded data that can be gathered. The data captured can be imaged and is being used by vehicle manufacturers, law enforcement officers, and collision reconstructionists to better understand what is happening in a collision. In accident investigation, EDRs have the potential to provide independent measurements of crash data that would elsewise be estimated by reconstruction methodology.

6/27/2018 · Corrosion
When thinking about the safe operation of boilers (and don't we all?), several systems can readily be named; flame control, fuel/air ratio; steam pressure control, levels in the vessel, etc. What about the water? It seems so passive, as long as there is enough for level control, what's the big deal? Well, it turns out, that as the steam produced by a boiler is used in the process, the condensate from that steam is returned to the boiler as feedwater. However, since 100% of the condensate is not returned, whatever solids had been in that water before it evaporated to form steam are left in the remaining water. Fresh feedwater is added to maintain levels, but even fresh water contains some dissolved solids. So over time, the water in the boiler system gets saturated with all sorts of dissolved minerals.