banner ad

Accident Investigation & Reconstruction Expert Witnesses

Sort Non-Featured Profiles by
< 1 2 3 4 5 6 12 >
Check for SynapsUs
Office of Design & Construction
2115 Third Street, Suite 208
Santa Monica CA 90405
USA
phone: 805-798-0010
Jeffrey-Weinstein-Architect-Construction-Management-Expert-Photo.jpg
Jeffrey Phillip Weinstein, AIA, a California licensed Architect since 1982, with Masters Degree in Real Estate Development from USC, has been involved in the development, design and construction of office buildings, high-rise condominiums, multi-family residential podium-type projects, retail, neighborhood shopping centers and regional malls, hotels and resorts, hospitals, and schools (K-12 and University).

Expert in real estate development, government approvals, entitlements & permits, architect's standard of care, construction management, claims & defects, A/E/C agreements. Expertise includes building envelope & water intrusion, zoning & building codes, errors/omissions, destructive testing & repair, schools (DSA), hospitals (OSHPD), condominiums, commercial/retail/mixed-use projects, high-rise structures, hotels & resorts. Previous employers include Nadel and Callison Architects, Tishman Construction, Trammel Crow Company, Kaiser Permanente, and California State University.

Professional Licenses / Certifications / Affiliations:
  • California Registered Architect, License #12822
  • Member, American Institute of Architects, Urban Land Institute, Construction Specification Institute, and Society for Marketing Professional Services
  • Member, North Santa Barbara County Board of Architectural Review
Litigation Support: Jeffrey Weinstein has been retained as an expert witness as Owner's Representative, Construction Manager, Contract Administrator, Project Manager and Architect by Developers, Builders, Institutional Owners (Hospitals & Schools), Municipalities, and Corporate Clients. Mr. Weinstein provides professional Architectural and Construction Expert Witness opinion, testimony and services on matters, such as:
  • Architectural
  • Forensic Architectural
  • Construction Management
  • Building Code Requirements
  • Construction Industry Standards
  • Professional Standard of Care
  • Design Defects, Errors & Omissions
  • Construction Defects & Failures
  • Architectural Practice & Peer Review
  • Construction Claim Evaluation
  • Change Order Analysis & Cost Overruns
  • Zoning Entitlements, Land-Use, and Permitting
  • Project Delivery - Fast-Track, Design-Build, GMP
  • Design & Construction Accident Claims
  • View Jeffrey P. Weinstein's Consulting Profile.
    9/11/2017 · Construction
    ln our current climate of economic prosperity and rising real estate values, the prevalence and usefulness of construction litigation may be on the wane. Much of the litigation and expert opinion in recent years has resulted in unrealistic repair schemes for the sole purpose of producing a settlement among parties to the litigation. When a plaintiff expert recommends a "remove and replace in its entirety"1 scenario (for example, arguing that all exterior stucco must be demolished and reinstalled due to a lack of expansion joints), the defense expert frequently advocates a more modest "fix what's broken" scheme to provide a minimum repair at the lowest cost. This process consumes considerable time and resources, and creates a difficult environment in which to craft a settlement. More often than not, neither party is pleased with the outcome; unreasonable plaintiff positions often result in settlement amounts ranging between 15 to 25 percent of the claim amount.

    Check for SynapsUs
    Jeffery H. Warren, PhD, PE , CSP
    Chief Engineer & CEO
    Mail: PO Box 1608
    Visit: 7805 Saint Andrews Road
    Irmo SC 29063
    USA
    phone: 888- 827-7823 / 803-732-6600
    fax: 803-732-7576
    Jeffery-Warren-Mechanical-Engineering-Expert-Photo.jpg

    Jeffery H. Warren, PhD, PE, CSP is Chief Engineer and CEO of The Warren Group. A licensed professional engineer in 14 states, he holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of North Carolina as well as a Master of Science and a Doctorate in Mechanical Engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University — all with machine design emphasis. 

    Background Experience - A former research engineer for DuPont at the Savannah River Laboratory, Dr. Warren designed, patented, and built an incinerator to burn radioactive waste. He also taught mathematics and engineering at the University of South Carolina in Aiken. Later, Dr. Warren was chief machine designer and owner of Warren Engineering Company, Inc., which designed and built special machinery for manufacturing automation. He combined his passion for keeping people safe with his knowledge of mechanical engineering, machine design, risk assessment, and safety to pursue a career in forensic engineering. 

    Dr. Warren is a Certified Safety Professional in engineering aspects and a Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator. He has investigated more than 2,000 claims involving property damage and injuries related to machinery, equipment, and products since 1987. Dr. Warren is a court-qualified expert in mechanical engineering, machine design, risk assessment, and safety. He’s also testified in several hundred depositions and more than 75 trials in state and federal court. He has successfully passed Daubert challenges. Dr. Warren was on the committee that authored the ANSI Technical Report, ANSI B11.TR3-2000 entitled, “Risk Assessment and Risk Reduction – A Guide to Estimate, Evaluate and Reduce Risks Associated with Machine Tools.” He regularly investigates personal injury and wrongful death product liability claims as well as property damage claims involving machinery and equipment in both manufacturing and construction workplaces for both the plaintiff and the defense. He has a reputation for thoroughly analyzing each case to provide precise, understandable, fact-based opinions. 

    Dr. Warren has a way of making complicated mechanical engineering, machine design, risk assessment and safety concepts understandable to the ordinary person. He also presents classes and seminars on topics ranging from investigation of machinery and equipment, unintentional injury claims, subrogation and SAFETYTHROUGHDESIGN®. 

    Areas of Expertise:

    • Machine Design and Safeguarding
    • Mechanical Engineering
    • Risk Assessment
    • Safety
    Welcome to the second part in our multipart blog series examining a young boy's fall and injury at a public playground. If you missed the first part in this series, click www.warrenforensics.com/2017/10/11/children-will-fall-at-playgrounds-what-shall-we-do-to-protect-them-a-multipart-blog-series-part-i/ to read it. In this post, we will highlight some resources that designers of public playgrounds can use to help ensure their designs are reasonably safe.

    In 2011, a 5-year old boy was severely injured at a public playground when he fell through a second floor opening around a fireman's pole in a playhouse. He fell more than seven feet and struck a bare concrete floor. We are thankful that he eventually recovered from his injuries. The person who designed and built the playground was accused of negligence. A lawsuit ensued, and eventually settled in favor of the boy.

    Check for SynapsUs
    Matthew Warren
    Main Contact
    Mail: PO Box 1608
    Visit: 7805 Saint Andrews Road
    Irmo SC 29063
    USA
    phone: 888- 827-7823 / 803-732-6600
    fax: 803-732-7576
    warren-forensics-logo.gif

    Warren Forensic Engineers and Consultants, founded in 1997, is extremely well versed in the disciplines of Mechanical, Electrical, Chemical, Structural, and Fire and Explosion investigation. Their engineers are known for delivering the truth — origin, cause, responsibility, and cost of an event or claim — with unmistakable clarity. Warren Forensics provides technical investigations and analyses of personal injury and property claims as well as expert testimony for insurance adjusters and attorneys. Each member of their engineering team is a licensed professional engineer (P.E.) in multiple states. Beyond engineering expertise, their engineers and consultants also hold a variety of other certifications including Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator, Certified Vehicle Fire Investigator, Certified Fire Investigation Instructor, CMSE®-Certified Machine Safety Expert, Certified Safety Professional, Certified Building Inspector, and Certified Property and Evidence Specialist. 

    Types of Loss:

    • Chemical: Ammonia - Confined Space - OSHA
    • Collision: Animal - ATV - Automotive - Bicycle - Farm Equipment - Motorcycle - Pedestrian - Truck
    • Commercial: Construction Defects - Construction Related Losses - Electrical and Control Systems - Liability Claims - Lightning Damage - Mechanical Systems - Roofing - Slip, Trip and Fall - Structural - Water Damage - Workplace Injuries
    • Fires and Explosions: Boiler - Commercial - CSST - Dust Explosions - Electrical - Fire Protection Systems - Industrial - LP and Natural Gas - Machinery and Equipment - Marine - Residential - Spontaneous Combustion - Structural - Vehicle and Mobile Equipment - Welding and Hot Work
    • Industrial: Boilers and Pressure Vessels - Construction Defects - Construction Related Losses - Cranes, Hoists, Lifting and Rigging - Electrical and Control Systems - Industrial Process Equipment - Liability Claims - Lightning Damage - Machinery and Equipment - Material Handling - Mechanical Systems - Roofing - Slip, Trip and Fall - Structural - Water Damage - Workplace Injuries
    • Inland and Ocean: Boilers and Pressure Vessels - Bulk Material Handling - Cargo Damage Assessment - Cargo Handling - Cranes, Hoists, Lifting and Rigging - Docks and Piers - Machinery and Equipment - Marinas - Marine Collisions - Marine Fire Protection Systems - Marine Liability Analysis - Mechanical and Electrical Systems - Slip, Trip and Fall - Workplace Injuries
    • Residential: Construction Defects - Construction Related Losses - Electrical Systems - Lightning Damage - Mechanical Systems - Roofing - Slip, Trip and Fall - Structural - Water Damage
    • Subrogation: Consumer Products - Electrical - Fire and Explosions - Machinery and Equipment - Workers’ Compensation
    • Catastrophic: Earthquake - Flood - Freeze, Ice and Snow - Hail Storm - Hurricane - Tornado - Wildfire - Wind Storm and Wind Shear

    Featured Experts:

    10/8/2018 · Chemical Industry
    On December 3, 1984, at a pesticide ingredient manufacturing facility owned by Union Carbide, a leak occurred in the Methyl Isocyanate (MIC) plant. Due to the toxic nature of the gases released and the plant's proximity to local residences, the death toll was in the thousands; both plant workers and nearby residents. The first recorded public meeting in response to this incident was on December 9th, in Institute, WV, the site of Union Carbide's only US MIC production unit. Full disclosure: my father was a research & development chemist for Union Carbide and Institute is about 10 miles down the Kanawha River from my hometown of Charleston, WV.

    Welcome to the second part in our multipart blog series examining a young boy's fall and injury at a public playground. If you missed the first part in this series, click www.warrenforensics.com/2017/10/11/children-will-fall-at-playgrounds-what-shall-we-do-to-protect-them-a-multipart-blog-series-part-i/ to read it. In this post, we will highlight some resources that designers of public playgrounds can use to help ensure their designs are reasonably safe.

    Many people just take for granted that something is just going to work, and in many cases assume that it will work forever. One such device that does not get enough attention is the Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI). Simply put, a GFCI is a protective device that compares the current flowing on the hot and neutral wires of the circuit and will "trip" to disconnect power to the circuit if a small imbalance of current is detected. The imbalance of current is an indication of a dangerous alternate path for the current to flow from a damaged line cord or a fault inside an appliance and constitutes a shock hazard to a person.

    In 2011, a 5-year old boy was severely injured at a public playground when he fell through a second floor opening around a fireman's pole in a playhouse. He fell more than seven feet and struck a bare concrete floor. We are thankful that he eventually recovered from his injuries. The person who designed and built the playground was accused of negligence. A lawsuit ensued, and eventually settled in favor of the boy.

    Event Data Recorders (EDRs) were first introduced by General Motors (GM) in 1974. That data was only available to GM; however, since 1994 more and more vehicle EDR’s have recorded data that can be gathered. The data captured can be imaged and is being used by vehicle manufacturers, law enforcement officers, and collision reconstructionists to better understand what is happening in a collision. In accident investigation, EDRs have the potential to provide independent measurements of crash data that would elsewise be estimated by reconstruction methodology.

    6/27/2018 · Corrosion
    When thinking about the safe operation of boilers (and don't we all?), several systems can readily be named; flame control, fuel/air ratio; steam pressure control, levels in the vessel, etc. What about the water? It seems so passive, as long as there is enough for level control, what's the big deal? Well, it turns out, that as the steam produced by a boiler is used in the process, the condensate from that steam is returned to the boiler as feedwater. However, since 100% of the condensate is not returned, whatever solids had been in that water before it evaporated to form steam are left in the remaining water. Fresh feedwater is added to maintain levels, but even fresh water contains some dissolved solids. So over time, the water in the boiler system gets saturated with all sorts of dissolved minerals.

    Check for SynapsUs
    John Phillips, PE, CFEI
    Senior Consulting Engineer
    Mail: PO Box 1608
    Visit: 7805 Saint Andrews Road
    Irmo SC 29063
    USA
    phone: 888- 827-7823 / 803-732-6600
    fax: 803-732-7576
    John-Phillips-Crane-Heavy-Equipment-Expert-Photo.jpg

    John Phillips, PE, CFEI, Senior Consulting Engineer, has more than 30 years of Crane and Heavy Equipment experience and more than 20 years of experience in forensic engineering. In addition to holding a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of South Carolina, Mr. Phillips is a Licensed Professional Engineer in South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, Louisiana, Ohio and Minnesota. He is NCEES registered both as a model engineer and with The United States Council for International Engineering Practice. During his career, Mr. Phillips has designed crane systems, supervised installation, tested and certified lifting equipment even serving as a project engineer for maintenance and certification of nuclear weapon lifting and handling systems. His extensive experience helps him determine the cause and scope of damage for crane, hoist, and other lift equipment incidents. In addition, he’s a certified Fire and Explosion Investigator and a certified Fire Investigator Instructor by the National Association of Fire Investigators. 

    Mr. Phillips is adept at determining the origin, cause, and scope of damage for equipment and structural fires. He also evaluates consumer and industrial equipment for product defects, guarding, and safety issues. He has testified in depositions and trials in state and federal court. Mr. Phillips is a member of the International Code Council (ICC), American Society of Materials (ASM) and the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM), as well as a voting member of the ASTM Performance of Buildings, Forensic Sciences, Forensic Engineering, and Ships & Marine committees. 

    Areas of Expertise:

    • Cranes and Heavy Machinery
    • Hoist and Lifts
    • Crane / Heavy Equipment Failure Analysis
    • Fires and Explosions
    • Industrial Accident Reconstruction
    • Machinery Damage Assessment
    Check for SynapsUs
    Jennifer Morningstar, BSChE, PE, CFEI
    Chemical Engineer
    Mail: PO Box 1608
    Visit: 7805 Saint Andrews Road
    Irmo SC 29063
    USA
    phone: 888- 827-7823 / 803-732-6600
    fax: 803-732-7576
    Jennifer-Morningstar-Chemical-Release-Expert-Photo.jpg

    Jennifer Morningstar, PE, CFEI, is a licensed professional engineer in South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, Iowa and West Virginia, and an NCEES Model Law Engineer. Ms. Morningstar is a member of the National Association of Fire Investigators (NAFI) and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). She holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Chemical Engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, as well as a Masters of Business Administration from the University of South Carolina. Background Experience - Ms. Morningstar has 19 years of industrial experience. She spent 16 years working at a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) manufacturer gaining familiarity with all the unit operations. Her experience includes distributed control systems (DCS) and programmable logic controllers (PLC). She is an OSHA-trained Process Hazard Analysis study leader and completed Root Cause Failure Analysis training to become an Incident Investigator. Ms. Morningstar authored Lockout / Tagout Procedures and Confined Space Entry Procedures. She also managed capital expansion projects in excess of $1M and then spent 3 years as an energy management consultant in a variety of industries including mineral extraction, pulp & paper, animal harvesting & packaging (including rendering) and grain milling. Ms. Morningstar worked with both natural gas and coal-fired boilers producing saturated steam and super-heated steam for cogeneration. Other processes in her expertise include air compressors, cooling towers, chillers, multi-stage ammonia-based refrigeration systems, waste water treatment and biogas production. Areas of Expertise:

    • Chemical Release and Exposure
    • Environmental Regulatory Compliance
    • OSHA Process Safety Management
    • Industrial Accident Investigation
    • Fires and Explosions
    • Confined Space Entry
    • Lockout / Tagout
    • Scope of Damage / Cost to Repair
    10/8/2018 · Chemical Industry
    On December 3, 1984, at a pesticide ingredient manufacturing facility owned by Union Carbide, a leak occurred in the Methyl Isocyanate (MIC) plant. Due to the toxic nature of the gases released and the plant's proximity to local residences, the death toll was in the thousands; both plant workers and nearby residents. The first recorded public meeting in response to this incident was on December 9th, in Institute, WV, the site of Union Carbide's only US MIC production unit. Full disclosure: my father was a research & development chemist for Union Carbide and Institute is about 10 miles down the Kanawha River from my hometown of Charleston, WV.

    6/27/2018 · Corrosion
    When thinking about the safe operation of boilers (and don't we all?), several systems can readily be named; flame control, fuel/air ratio; steam pressure control, levels in the vessel, etc. What about the water? It seems so passive, as long as there is enough for level control, what's the big deal? Well, it turns out, that as the steam produced by a boiler is used in the process, the condensate from that steam is returned to the boiler as feedwater. However, since 100% of the condensate is not returned, whatever solids had been in that water before it evaporated to form steam are left in the remaining water. Fresh feedwater is added to maintain levels, but even fresh water contains some dissolved solids. So over time, the water in the boiler system gets saturated with all sorts of dissolved minerals.

    Check for SynapsUs
    Thomas J. Kelly, MSEE, MBA, PE, CFEI
    Senior Consulting Engineer
    Mail: PO Box 1608
    Visit: 7805 Saint Andrews Road
    Irmo SC 29063
    USA
    phone: 888- 827-7823 / 803-732-6600
    fax: 803-732-7576
    Tom-Kelly-Electrical-Engineering-Expert-Photo.jpg
    Thomas J. Kelly, MSEE, MBA, PE, CFEI, Senior Consulting Engineer, is a licensed professional engineer in South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Maryland, and an NCEES Model Law Engineer. He has both a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering and a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida, along with a Master of Business Administration, with an emphasis in strategic leadership, from Winthrop University, Rock Hill, South Carolina.

    Mr. Kelly's 25-year career in electrical engineering includes forensic engineering investigation involving industrial electrical accidents, electrical equipment failure analysis, control system failures, including robotics and automation components and scope of damage assessments. He has conducted investigations for arc flash incidents, electrocution and electric shock accidents and lightning strike evaluations. From his large facilities management, Mr. Kelly has a depth of knowledge in building envelope performance, lighting system performance and compliance, low and medium voltage electrical distribution systems, and automated production control systems. Critical data infrastructure systems are a special area of interest including emergency and standby power systems.

    Mr. Kelly's experience also includes the design and analysis of Alternative Energy Systems utilizing both solar and fuel cell technologies. A Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator, Tom is experienced in fire and explosion analysis, origin, and cause investigations. Drawing from prior product design work, he has a wide range of experiences with product defect analysis and evaluating the workmanship of installed electrical systems.

    Areas of Expertise:
    • Electrical Equipment Failures
    • Electrocution and Electric Shock Accidents
    • Fires and Explosions
  • Industrial Electrical Accidents
  • Lightning Strike Analysis
  • Scope of Damage - Estimate of Repair
  • Many people just take for granted that something is just going to work, and in many cases assume that it will work forever. One such device that does not get enough attention is the Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI). Simply put, a GFCI is a protective device that compares the current flowing on the hot and neutral wires of the circuit and will "trip" to disconnect power to the circuit if a small imbalance of current is detected. The imbalance of current is an indication of a dangerous alternate path for the current to flow from a damaged line cord or a fault inside an appliance and constitutes a shock hazard to a person.

    Check for SynapsUs
    J. Steven Hunt, CPCU, ARM, CXLT
    Senior Safety Consultant
    Mail: PO Box 1608
    Visit: 7805 Saint Andrews Road
    Irmo SC 29063
    usa
    phone: 888- 827-7823 / 803-732-6600
    fax: 803-732-7576
    Steven-Hunt-Fall-Safety-Expert-Photo.jpg
    J. Steven Hunt, CPCU, ARM, CXLT, is President and Senior Safety Consultant of The Warren Group. He has a Bachelor of Science in Administrative Management with a Minor in Occupational Safety and Health from Clemson University. He has also earned designations as an Associate Risk Management and Chartered Property and Liability Underwriter from Insurance Institute of America, Chicago, IL.

    Background Experience: Prior to entering the forensic field in 2000, Mr. Hunt worked 23 years in the insurance industry as a safety and loss prevention consultant where he took numerous training courses in the field of safety and loss prevention. At Commercial Union Insurance Company, he serviced a wide range of clients. While at Sedgwick James, a leading insurance services firm, he managed a group of safety consultants in the providing of safety and loss prevention services to major clients and businesses in the United States. In this role, he served as a risk management and safety consultant for local governmental associations in four states over a 17 year period and was the chief safety consultant to the Carolinas Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association for 14 years. As a safety and risk management consultant, Mr. Hunt conducted comprehensive audits of client loss prevention programs, made detailed inspections of premises, investigated incidents and losses, and wrote technical reports of finding that included recommendations for improvement and loss minimization.

    Mr. Hunt has authored and developed a number of safety programs for private and public sector clients as well as conducted many safety training programs for clients. He has been a member of both the American Society of Safety Engineers since 1979 and Chartered Property & Casualty Underwriters’ since 1989.

    Mr. Hunt leverages his extensive expertise, training, and education to investigate premises liability incidents, construction falls, and safety management programs. As an expert witness, he has been court qualified as an expert in safety, fall safety, codes and standards, and incident investigation.

    Mr. Hunt has personally investigated more than 1,000 accidents in his more than 40 plus year career, including 36 cases that involved fatalities.

    Areas of Expertise:
    • Accident Investigation
    • Construction Falls & Incidents
    • OSHA Safety Codes and Standards
  • Premises Liability
  • Pedestrian Falls
  • Safety and Risk Management
  • Check for SynapsUs
    John Holecek, MSME, PE, CSE, CFEI
    Senior Consulting Engineer
    Mail: PO Box 1608
    Visit: 7805 Saint Andrews Road
    Irmo SC 29063
    USA
    phone: 888- 827-7823 / 803-732-6600
    fax: 803-732-7576
    John-Holecek-Industrial-Product-Design-Expert-Photo.jpg

    John Holecek, MSME, PE, CSE, CFEI, Senior Consulting Engineer, is a licensed professional engineer in 8 states and has both a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of South Carolina. Mr. Holecek has passed the professional engineering exam in both Mechanical and Controls Engineering. A NAFI Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator, he has more than 22 years of experience in the design of industrial, commercial and consumer products. These products include industrial ovens, paint spray systems, HVAC systems, conveyors, and gas appliances including commercial cooking equipment and gas grills. Mr. Holecek's design experience includes the control systems for these products as well as the normal safeguarding provisions applied to these products. Additionally, he has supervised manufacturing operations and managed outside contractors in site safety requirements and the installation of industrial process equipment. By virtue of his experience, he is well versed in federal and state worker safety regulations. 

    Areas of Expertise:

    • Electrical and Mechanical Control Systems
    • Fires and Explosions
    • Gas Fired Equipment and Appliances
    • ICC, NFPA, OSHA Codes and Standards
    • Industrial Processes and Operations
    • Safety Regulations
    Check for SynapsUs
    Aaron (Al) L. Duncan II, ACTAR
    Vehicle Collision Reconstructionist
    Mail: PO Box 1608
    Visit: 7805 Saint Andrews Road
    Irmo SC 29063
    USA
    phone: 888- 827-7823 / 803-732-6600
    fax: 803-732-7576
    Aaron-Duncan-Collision-Reconstruction-Expert-Photo.jpg

    Aaron (Al) Duncan II, ACTAR, is a Vehicle Collision Reconstructionist with Warren. He is accredited as a Traffic Accident Reconstructionist by The Accreditation Commission for Traffic Accident Reconstruction. 

    Background Experience - Prior to joining Warren, Mr. Duncan worked for 23 years as a South Carolina Highway Patrol Trooper to include 10 years as a Multi-Disciplinary Accident Investigation Team (M.A.I.T.) member. As a trooper, he investigated in excess of 1,000 vehicle accidents and incidents. Then, as a member of M.A.I.T. for 10 years, he was involved in over 1,000 detailed investigations and collision reconstructions. Mr. Duncan is a member of the South Carolina Association of Reconstruction Specialists (SCARS), the International Association of Accident Reconstruction Specialists (IAARS), and the Blue Knights International Motorcycle Group. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Political Science from Lander University in Greenwood, South Carolina and completed the Law Enforcement Basic Program at the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy in Columbia, South Carolina. 

    Mr. Duncan has testified multiple times in state courts and he has been court qualified as an expert in accident investigation and collision reconstruction. His expertise focuses on investigating and reconstructing vehicle collisions involving single and multi-vehicles, animals, pedestrians, motorcycles, heavy trucks, and commercial vehicles. Mr. Duncan is also a skilled user of Forensic Mapping Technology and Computerized Collision Diagramming Software for collision scene analysis. He is experienced in the data download and analysis of airbag black boxes (Crash Data Retrieval Units) in automobiles, pickup trucks, and SUVs. 

    Areas of Expertise:

    • Crash Data Retrieval
    • Forensic Mapping Technology
    • Vehicle Collision Reconstruction
    Event Data Recorders (EDRs) were first introduced by General Motors (GM) in 1974. That data was only available to GM; however, since 1994 more and more vehicle EDR’s have recorded data that can be gathered. The data captured can be imaged and is being used by vehicle manufacturers, law enforcement officers, and collision reconstructionists to better understand what is happening in a collision. In accident investigation, EDRs have the potential to provide independent measurements of crash data that would elsewise be estimated by reconstruction methodology.

    Check for SynapsUs
    Roger Davis, PE, CFEI
    Senior Consulting Engineer
    Mail: PO Box 1608
    Visit: 7805 Saint Andrews Road
    Irmo SC 29063
    USA
    phone: 888- 827-7823 / 803-732-6600
    fax: 803-732-7576
    Roger-Davis-Mechanical-Engineering-Expert-Photo.jpg
    Roger Davis, PE, CFEI, Senior Consulting Engineer, is a Licensed Professional Engineer in South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi. Mr. Davis holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and a Master of Business Administration from the University of South Carolina. He also has a certificate in Crane Safety from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Distance Learning and Professional Education Center as well as certificates in Fire and Explosion Investigation and Vehicle Fire Investigation.

    Mr. Davis is experienced with municipal water, sanitary sewer, and storm water system design, construction, and operations. His expertise also includes property damage and personal injury investigations involving municipal utilities. Mr. Davis is an accomplished gas and diesel engine mechanic and has more than 30 years of experience with hydraulic plumbing and piping issues. He gained practical experience in hydraulics, fluid flow, tanks, and material handling with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) and Laidlaw Environmental Services, Inc., the largest hazardous and industrial waste firm in North America. He also gained experience in industrial operations as a Manufacturing Engineer.

    Roger Davis has investigated claims and injuries ranging from pressure piping system failures and material and personnel handling equipment to large engine failures and fires involving machinery, generators and vehicles.

    Areas of Expertise:
    • Aerial Lifts
    • Failure Analysis
    • Industrial and Accident Reconstruction
  • Machine Safeguarding
  • Products Liability Vehicle
  • Mechanical Failure
  • Water and Sewer Systems
  • Check for SynapsUs
    44648 Mound Rd.
    Suite 174
    Sterling Heights MI 48314
    USA
    phone: 248-408-7981
    Douglas-Van-Sweden-Vehicle-Accident-Reconstruction-Expert-Photo.jpg
    Douglas J. Van Sweden, PE, is a Mechanical Engineer with over 45 years of experience in the automobile industry, including 20 years with the General Motors Corporation.

    Litigation Support - Since 1997, Mr. Van Sweden has been providing insurance companies, legal firms, and manufacturers with the objective, scientific research to clearly define what really happened, for the cost-effective answer. The facilities, equipment, training, and commitment to continuing education allow him to find and assemble the critical missing pieces in Accident Reconstruction cases. He painstakingly reconstructs events so the end picture will be the accurate and defensible answer to what really happened.

    Mr. Van Sweden's services are available to attorneys representing plaintiff and defendant and include site review, record review, thorough reports, depositions, and trial testimony as needed.

    Vehicle Expertise:
    • Cars
    • Trucks
    • Motorcycles
    • Boats
  • Recreational Vehicles
  • Bicycles
  • Personal Watercraft
  • Non-Transportation - Elevators, Hoists:
    • Vehicle Systems and Structures
    • Vehicle Design
    • Seat Belt and Airbag Restraint Systems
    • Interior Components
    • Fuel Systems
    • Electrical Systems
    • Cooling Systems
    • Exhaust Systems
  • Drive Trains
  • Brakes
  • Suspensions
  • Steering
  • Body
  • Corrosion
  • Crash Testing
  • Fires and Explosion Cause / Origin
  • Check for SynapsUs
    Ronald Tyson
    President
    565 N. Ortonville Road
    Ortonville MI 48462
    USA
    phone: (248) 230–9561
    fax: (248) 230–8476
    BUILDING & PREMISES EXPERT, Review and research to render opinions on correct building codes and life-safety standards concerning construction, ADA & OSHA issues. Opinions on causation & foreseeability, licensed builder with many years of subcontracting & general contracting [hands-on] experience. Plaintiff and Defense attorney clients. Continuing education studies. Never disqualified in over 200 times in court. Addressing allegations of Building Mold, Faulty Construction, Failure to disclose, Personal Injury, Manufactured Housing & other construction issues and Condominium claims. Addressing breach of contract issues. Ronald Tyson 248.230.9561 fax 248.230.8476 ronaldtyson@mac.com.
    Check for SynapsUs
    Mike Napier
    CEO/President
    530 Forest Hill Road,Suite D
    Macon GA 31210
    USA
    phone: 478-750-7279
    fax: 478-745-3040
    napier_logo.jpg
    Mike Napier is a Trucking Expert with more than 40 years experience in the commercial motor vehicle (CMV) industry. He has worked in the real world of trucking and CMV operations, holding positions from Chief Executive Officer to Truck Driver and virtually every position in between. If you are looking for a Trucking Expert who not only knows the written text of the regulations, as is required of any competent Safety Director, but also has hands-on trucking experience of a truck driver and can speak to the issues of how the trucking industry operates from the top down, you have found him!

    Mr. Napier will equip an attorney with the knowledge that opposing counsel may not have. Mr. Napier’s unique experience differs dramatically from nearly all other commercial or trucking industry experts; in that he has first-hand knowledge and understands a trucking company’s organizational & operational structure and has a firm command of the regulations and the nexus of the industry standards of care.

    Mr. Napier’s diverse experience includes, but is not limited to, the following issues:
  • Regulatory and Industry Standards Of Care
  • Hours of Service and Symptoms of Fatigue
  • Safety & Health Standards
  • Preservation of Records
  • Corporate Financial Statements
  • Drug and Alcohol Testing
  • Accident Investigation
  • Brokers of Property
  • Levels of Financial Responsibility
  • Out of Service Violations
  • Registration and Insurance
  • Process Agent Designation
  • Operating Authority
  • Trucking Company Research Data
  • Common, Contract, Private or Exempt Motor Carriers
  • Hazardous Material Regulations
  • Lease and Interchange Agreements for CMV Tractor or Trailers
  • Truck Driver Duties on the Road
  • Motor Carrier Compliance Duties
  • Various Motor Carrier Related Contracts
  • and Much More. ..
  • Driver Qualifications
  • Driver Medical Qualifications
  • Commercial Driver Licenses
  • Hiring, Retention and Supervision
  • Employer-Employee Relationships
  • Accident Contributing Factors
  • Driver Skills Testing
  • Loading/Unloading
  • Cargo Securement
  • Electronic Control Modules (i.e. Black-box)
  • Satellite Tracking Systems/GPS (i.e. Qualcomm)
  • Tractor/ Trailer Inspections/Maintenance
  • DOT Compliance Reviews
  • Interstate or Intrastate Rules
  • Cargo Claims or Losses
  • Third Partly Logistics Agents (3PL)
  • Agents
  • Motor Carrier Liabilities
  • Fuel Tax Reporting
  • DOT Safety Fitness and Ratings
  • Human Resource Issues
  • Check for SynapsUs
    Ned Einstein
    President
    15-17 S. William Street,Suite 3A
    New York NY 10004
    USA
    phone: 212-766-1121 (NY) or 818-988-4586 (LA)
    fax: 212-766-1122
    neinstein-photo.jpg
    Areas of Expertise: Accident analysis, testimony and mediation in vehicle and pedestrian accidents involving transit, paratransit, schoolbus, motorcoach, special education, non-emergency medical transportation, taxi, shuttle, child transport systems and services; slips and falls; crossing, boarding and alighting; wheelchairs; seatbelts; ADA and accessibility; passenger safety, security and sexual abuse; vehicle design, specification, crashworthiness, quality assurance and product liability; industry standards and practices; driver training and vehicle operation; management, monitoring, supervision and enforcement; maintenance; NHTSA, FTA, FMCSA and USDOT regulations; vehicle testing and certification; contract negotiation and compliance; risk management; planning and system design.

    The Firm: Transportation Alternatives is a passenger transportation and automotive consortium engaged in consulting and forensic accident investigation and analysis (more than 350 cases). Specializes in elderly, disabled, schoolchildren.

    Education: MURP (Urban and Regional Planning): George Washington University, 1975 BA, English Literature: Rutgers University, 1969

    Professional Experience:
  • President, Transportation Alternatives (1980 to present). Consulted to USDOT, transit agencies, private contractors, social service agencies, municipalities and school districts. Designed several major transportation systems
  • Chairman/General Manager, PTS Transportation (1982-1992). Directed operations of a 70-vehicle paratransit system for physically and developmentally disabled individuals and a non-emergency medical transportation (NEMT) service
  • President, TAM-USA (1989-1995). Formed and directed a U.S.-Slovene joint venture company which coordinated the design, testing, certification and marketing of a European-manufactured school bus and motorcoach.

    Appointments and Memberships:
  • American Public Transportation Association
  • National Association of Pupil Transportation
  • United Motorcoach Association
  • American Bus Association
  • Community Transportation Association of America
  • Association Internationale pour la Sécurité du Transport des Jeunes
  • National School Transportation Conference (1995, 2000, 2005)
  • Committee on School Transportation Safety, National Academy of Sciences
  • Bus Industry Safety Committee (ABA)
  • Access Committee (APTA)
  • 9/28/2018 · Transportation
    An industry outsider (say, a juror) might consider the variation in passenger assistance within the public transportation industry alarming. Exploring a single theme like boarding and alighting illustrates the extremes

    9/5/2018 · Transportation
    It might seem obvious that a bus driver would know how to properly turn a vehicle with a long wheelbase. Yet it is surprising how many are not taught to. More interesting, bus drivers often do not have the time to.

    8/16/2018 · Transportation
    Given the mass of a bus or motorcoach, the carnage a moving bus or coach can inflict on a pedestrian is not surprising. Yet readers may be surprised by the carnage such a vehicle can cause when it is not moving - or just beginning to move or come to a stop.

    7/23/2018 · Transportation
    For each route in each direction, transit stops are almost always located on one side of an intersection, not both. Stops just before the intersection are referred to as 'near-side' stops. Those just after the intersection are referred to as 'far-side' stops.

    6/7/2018 · Transportation
    Other than airport-to-parking lot shuttles, and an occasional tour or charter trip, all public transportation services pickup and discharge their passengers at the side of a roadway. When it is available, they pickup and discharge them from or onto a curb, sidewalk, platform or other raised surface.

    5/17/2018 · Transportation
    For many passengers, the 14-inch drop from the bottom step of a high-floor transit bus or motorcoach is challenging. In transit service, drivers do not assist or even spot boarding or alighting passengers. While motorcoach drivers typically assist or spot boarding or alighting passengers at the front door, the drivers of motorcoaches deployed in commuter/express service (provided by transit agencies or companies under contract to them) do not. Nor do scheduled service drivers do so consistently, especially at intermediate stops.

    4/12/2018 · Transportation
    In Part 1 of this three-installment series, I characterized the development of MCI's new ramp-equipped accessible motorcoach (the MCI D45 CRT LE) as a "paradigm shift." While I will expand on why this is so in the third and last installment next month, this installment will overview the most unique features of this remarkable vehicle -- a vehicle whose ultimate potential I feel has not yet been realized.

    As an urban planner by background, there are certain clichés I have grown to loath. Among my least favorite is the phrase 'paradigm shift.' This is because few things in the transportation field ever comprise a paradigm shift. Among the true exceptions were the 45-foot-long coach, the proliferation of double-deckers, Megabus pricing, and the advances in super-clean diesel engines. Autonomous coaches seem decades away (even while exploding on the scene in Europe). Otherwise, nothing else close to a paradigm shift in this traditional industry comes to mind.

    Speeding would seem like the most obvious safety compromise. Speeding would seem like the most natural remedy to a schedule too tight, and the most obvious way to pick up more passengers, increase system capacity and maximize revenue: Just drive faster.

    Among all the safety compromises pandemic to the public transportation industry, wheelchair tipovers are, by far, the least common to the motorcoach sector compared to other services which deploy accessible vehicles. Of course, this is largely because so few wheelchair users travel by motorcoach.

    In Part 1 of this series, I introduced the notion that roughly half of all public transportation-related incidents are the result of a deliberate trade-off of passenger safety for some system or owner's benefit. The most common benefit is the service provider's operating a schedule that is too tight.

    This new National Bus Trader piece is the first installment of likely a year-long series about types of incidents that result from trade-offs of safety for other benefits -- adherence to unrealistically-tight schedules (or drivers running behind schedule) being the principal culprit. Frankly, of the more than 600 public transportation-related lawsuits in which I have served as an expert witness, roughly half of all incidents see to be the result of some deliberate safety compromise.

    The past eight installments of this series covered a lot of ground -- some technical, but mostly socio-economic and conceptual. But in the debate over the pros and cons of human versus robotic drivers, is it not possible to have the wisdom to take the best of both worlds? In early articles I acknowledged some of the advantages of Highly-Automated Vehicles (HAVs), including:

    What is interesting, and the focus of this installment, is the glaring disparity between the magnitude of information available about a vehicle or driver's performance and the general disinterest in examining it. This disparity is not a technological problem. It is largely an institutional and attitudinal problem. Or one might characterize it as a cultural problem. Or a values problem in a money-oriented society. Nevertheless, it raises an important point about driverless vehicles: While a vehicle's brain may contribute to and/or improve safety (fewer accidents and incidents) and performance (e.g., better mileage, less pollution), this brain's extraordinary analytical capabilities may be pointless because no non-robot is likely to ever examine the data.

    7/24/2017 · Transportation
    The previous six National Bus Trader articles on this subject stabbed at some highlights and low-lights within the extraordinary spectrum of socio-economic, institutional and other issues encompassed by our transition from humanoid-driven to robotic vehicles. At this point, I thought it might be helpful to take a quick glance at some of the hardware that serves as the robots' mechanical fixtures, apart from the electronics and the digitalia: Cameras and sensors. These components were employed in "transitional" or "steppingstone" efforts along the path to truly driverless vehicles. So I feel it is worth a look at how these technologies were used and abused at this earlier stage of HAV (highly-automated vehicle) development. Should the reader wish to view the math in the robots' brains, I recommend Multiple View Geometry in Computer Vision by Richard Hartley and Andrew Zisserman. The bible for artificial intelligence. Way over my head. If also over yours, no apologies necessary.

    When an asteroid strikes a planet, things tend to change quickly. Most other changes occur gradually, even while a small handful are occasionally more significant. These latter changes are sometimes referred to as "paradigm shifts," largely because they affect so many things around them, and cause such dramatic changes in the things they affect directly.

    6/22/2017 · Transportation
    Industry insiders, including government officials, cite an interesting analogy as a justification for their initial jump into the regulation of driverless vehicles that was first promulgated on September 20, 2016. The point made is that, had current regulations been in effect when the "Model T" hit the streets, we would have experienced far fewer collisions.

    5/23/2017 · Transportation
    As Part 2 of this series hopefully demonstrated there is much to learn about what lies ahead in the motorcoach world from the experiences of modes deploying smaller vehicles. This installment provides a preview of the likely emergence of "highly-automated vehicles," or HAVs, in the world of large vehicles: School bus, transit and motorcoach service.

    3/28/2017 · Transportation
    In a monthly magazine, it is almost impossible to keep up changes that are racing along This past September, 2015, small fleets of Volvos and Ford Fusions were released into the general traffic stream in Pittsburgh, and driverless Anheuser-Busch trucks began delivering Budweiser and Bud Light. The Netherlands and Finland have been deploying driverless motorcoaches for months now. And we already have a few similar services operating in the U.S.

    2/13/2017 · Transportation
    In Part 1 of this series, I identified the enormous range of benefits that would likely accompany even the first wave of autonomous buses, coaches, trucks and delivery vehicles. And I identified a handful of dysfunctional consequences, the most serious of which is a Tsunami of driver unemployment. Lest anyone doubt these inevitabilities, he or she might consider consulting the seven-installment series in National Bus Trader titled "Bad Regulations and Worse Responses" (June 2014 through January 2015).

    12/28/2016 · Transportation
    National Bus Trader has always been a leader in its selection and treatment of topics related to technology and innovation. So the decision to craft a lengthy article about NBT Editor Larry Plachno's experiences "behind-the-wheel" of a motorcoach-of-the-future at a "ZF Ride & Drive" event in Aachen, Germany (NBT, September, 2016) should not have been a surprise. Nor should it come as a surprise that safety, liability and other issues related to this technology will be explored as well.

    8/19/2016 · Transportation
    The notion of "screening" driver-candidates for Sleep Apnea screening is not merely unsupportable, it is a delusion. In 2011, 517 truck drivers in Australia were tested for Obstructive Sleep Apnea ("Assessing Sleepiness and Sleep Disorder in Truck Drivers" in SLEEP, 2011). According to an anonymous self-evaluation questionnaire (a "multivariable apnea prediction index, based on self-report measures"), only 12% felt they had it, while roughly 4.4% had tested positive for it. Yet when all of them were tested, 41% more of them had this condition. The testing also found that a full 50% of the study participants were obese, and 49% of them smoked cigarettes. Neither of these parameters are included among the handful of criteria currently employed by either the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's or Federal Railway Administration's "recommended" screening exercise -- although, In fairness, the size-17 male neck (or size 16 female neck) serves as a proxy for obesity. At the same time, as noted below, it also captures plenty of "false positives."

    6/29/2016 · Transportation
    Like most fields, public transportation is swollen with studies, both in the U.S. and abroad. Yet some of the most fascinating things seem to be never studied, or rarely studied.

    5/23/2016 · Transportation
    This final installment of this series provides the rewards for reading the first six: Starting-point ideas about things the motorcoach industry can do defend its density against intrusion from Transportation Network Companies (like Uber, Lyft and Sidecar), which have already begun plunging into the charter and tour sectors, mostly with medium-sized, body-on-chassis vehicles. It also includes things that would help increase profits and create new service opportunities - and compete with new, legitimate players penetrating the market.

    4/13/2016 · Transportation
    As NATIONAL BUS TRADER readers following this series have noted, our judicial system seems to be "running the table" with TNC-related issues. The $220,000,000 settlement of a case against FEDEX effectively eliminated the notion of an "independent contractor" in its six states. And the California courts are soon likely to boot out Uber. The FEDEX case in the U.S. Court's 10th Circuit effectively rippled a TNC's ability to deprive its drivers of a regular employee's costly array of fringe benefits. This settlement is likely to soon play out in the other nine "Circuit" encompassing the other 44 states. And if Uber is booted out of California altogether, on top of the FEDEX settlement, the TNC threat will be diminished significantly.

    3/11/2016 · Transportation
    Practically beginning my public transportation career as a consultant to the U.S. Department of Transportation, I learned to hate "Wash-Speak." Government agencies do not compound things; they exacerbate them. They use nothing, but utilize everything. They never start anything, yet implement everything. And much-ado-about nothing is usually referred to as a paradigm shift.

    2/25/2016 · Transportation
    Well, by now, the "Cat's Out of the Bag" about transportation network companies (TNCs). For this, we owe our thanks to National Bus Trader, Limo, Charter and Tours Magazine (especially) and the United Motorcoach Association. The August 15, 2015 issue of the UMA-sponsored Bus & Motorcoach News contained two articles about these previously-unfettered, robot-controlled beasts.

    2/3/2016 · Transportation
    These past five years, practically unnoticed until this last one, have witnessed the most radical change in public transportation since the introduction of scheduling software in the Early 90s: The invasion of traditional, analog services wallowing in their nostalgia by hyper- [or uber]-digital counterparts big on access, low on some concerns, and flying beneath virtually every City's and State's regulatory radar.

    1/6/2016 · Transportation
    Mitchell Rouse! In the 1980s, a strapping, 6'4"-inch-tall visionary who had inherited a 50-vehicle taxicab company and, within a few years, expanded it into a 350-vehicle leviathan, along with eight small paratransit operations. With a heavily-computerized operation a decade before Windows took over the World, his dispatch office still answered every call with a live Earthling. Wilmington/Checker Cab was all about decency, respect and efficiency. And at a time when most of Los Angeles County was beginning to deteriorate rapidly into lines, menus, incompetence and traffic. Yet, as a brilliant manager with an expanding corporate mentality, Rouse was also a rabid supporter of Unionism, and embraced his Teamster's affiliation with pride.

    12/15/2015 · Transportation
    Like every mode of public transportation, and for almost every aspect of our society, the motorcoach industry has, over the decades, been affected significantly by regulations. Some of these experiences were challenging yet produced dramatic results that, among other benefits, have saved us money. One terrific example is that modern motorcoaches dump perhaps one percent of the particulates into our environment than they did a mere two decades ago. Here, the regulations, though challenging, were at least realistic. But our industries' (and other bus modes') responses to it - effectively our engine manufacturers - were far more important than the regulations: Their responses were magnificent.

    11/18/2015 · Transportation
    The explosion of digital technology has triggered increases in vehicle costs, purged small and medium-sized companies from the transportation landscape, and contributed to a nationwide shortage of qualified drivers. But it has taken its greatest toll on management, where supervisors with a genuine understanding of transportation are gradually being replaced by armies of "templeteers."

    11/2/2015 · Transportation
    In the last installment of National Bus Trader, "Fatigue Monitoring Technology" presented an overview of the approaches and devices in development, and available, to prevent and detect driver fatigue. But unlike prevention technologies, fatigue detection devices raise a unique question: What happens when they work?!

    9/30/2015 · Transportation
    Little in public transportation is as challenging as driving load upon load of wheelchair occupants, with unique needs (and often unique chairs), in all directions, with last-minute one-of-a-kind trips dispatched into tight schedules created days, or even weeks, in advance. Yet this is precisely what paratransit drivers do - hour after hour, day after day.

    8/14/2015 · Transportation
    With panoramic/wraparound windshields lying against the front plane, sun visors, tinted windshields, crossover and parabolic mirror systems, ergonomic driver compartments with tilting/telescopic steering columns and pneumatically-adjustable seats, video surveillance cameras and motion detection sensors - much less corrective lenses, sunglasses, annual vision examinations, and continual improvements in headlamps - one would think that bus drivers could see and react to large objects appearing directly in front of their vehicles. But, as many jurors learn, one would be wrong.

    7/8/2015 · Transportation
    Comparing their relative safety to that of other vehicles, a number of motorcoach features come immediately to mind: Mass, monocoque construction pneumatic suspension, and fully-padded, forward-facing seats. Yet incidents like these still occur:

    6/12/2015 · Transportation
    No, this is not the name of a case. It refers to a dangerous conflict coursing through the bus and motorcoach industries - a conflict that we cannot afford to let exist.

    5/13/2015 · Transportation
    The previous article in this series emphasized the importance of transportation professionals selecting bus stops instead of students or their parents doing so. Regardless, while plenty of tools are available to help, the critical tool for evaluating and approving safe bus stops is a live Earthling.

    In the last installment (STN, Jun, 2007), I stressed the importance of distinguishing between an actual bus stop and the waiting area across the street from it in terms of safety. But the selection of the stop and waiting area also involves concerns for student security. Sometimes, there are trade-offs that must be made. These trade-off are often complex and subtle. But they must be made correctly.

    3/6/2015 · Transportation
    Except in rural areas with vast distances between intersections, a bus stop can reasonably be placed in one of three positions:

    1/26/2015 · Transportation
    In those rare instances where the safety of transportation modes can be compared statistically, bus riders fare several decimal points better than bicycle riders. The risks associated with motorcycles are "off the charts." The Figure below illustrates these comparisons for "home-to-school" trips - trips that comprise 15 percent of all transit trips and 96 percent of all schoolbus trips.

    12/17/2014 · Transportation
    Every responsible society has mechanisms to hold its citizens, and their organizations, accountable for their actions. With respect to safety, our society effects this goal through the enactment and enforcement of statutes and regulations, and through the process of civil litigation. As with most rules and most societies, many of our transportation organizations have discovered loopholes. Employing these loopholes, they have effectively reduced their liability exposure at the cost of compromising safety.

    11/11/2014 · Transportation
    Unlike those of many transit systems, schoolbus stops are not always identified with signage - at either the precise position of the stop or signage indicating that a schoolbus stop is approaching (the black glyph on yellow background). Rarely is the stop zone itself marked (for example, by red-lining the curb). In particular, the failure to mark the stop's precise positioning can be problematic - and occasionally dangerous.

    10/2/2014 · Transportation
    As pressure from the unknowing continues to mount, rumors have it that the U.S. motorcoach industry is slowly inching toward the installation of seatbelts. That we are doing so by skipping the decades of seat compartmentalization that has helped fend off most seatbelt advocates in the schoolbus industry is only more unfortunate since existing motorcoach seats lend themselves to a far more evolved form of compartmentalization than the "incomplete compartmentalization" (in NHTSA's own words) of their yellow body-on-chassis cousins.

    8/27/2014 · Transportation
    Question: What is the difference between a poorly-selected and -designed bus stop and a land mine? Answer: Very little. When you step on either of them, your ankles, knees and hips are likely to explode. The genuine difference is that the carnage from land mines is intentional, whereas that of poorly-selected and -designed bus stops usually reflects incompetence and, often, indifference.

    7/23/2014 · Transportation
    As it affects liability, an operating agency's status as a "common carrier" has an enormous impact not only on determining liability itself, but depending on legal constructs in various states, can also affect considerations like immunity and/or the assessment of punitive damages - often barriers to the assessment of damages afforded to public agencies. So except for motorcoaches deployed in commuter/express service under contract to public transit agencies, these latter considerations rarely affect motorcoach operations in the courtroom.

    6/13/2014 · Transportation
    In rural areas, children spaced far apart were once transported to school by horse and wagon. After the first day of school, the horses learned the routes and simply repeated them day after day, eliminating the need for drivers. The vehicles were cheap, and the engines ran effectively on oats. As our nation changed, pupil transportation's development reflected our increasing urbanization and, later, suburbanization. These developments included a new phenomenon known as traffic. As a safety matter, the need for pupil transportation grew to reflect a child's inability to cross streets or negotiate intersections, as verified by studies like the 1968 Swedish study "Children in Traffic." In simple terms, children below age 13, and particularly below age 10, do not possess the physical, mental and emotional skills necessary to cross streets and intersections.

    At the rudimentary level at which most crossing procedures are executed, schoolbus drivers are supposed to "direct" the students across the roadway when they are certain that either the traffic has been stopped in both directions or it is so distant (if even visible) that the students could easily complete their crossing before any oncoming vehicles reach the bus. The bus would obviously have its red flashers and stop arm engaged as a "fail safe."

    Drummed into my head as a schoolchild was the mantra, "Cross at the Green, Not In Between." This slogan still provides the basis for Today's thinking about following the pedestrian path to and from school or a student's bus stop. When last year, a study of 7,000 pedestrian accidents in New York City over a four-year period was released, its findings turned this century-old cliché on its head. The implications for the pupil transportation industry are dramatic, and should awaken all of us to a new reality that may save hundreds if not thousands of lives a year, since most vehicle-pedestrian accidents happen to students walking or cycling to school, as well most of those traveling by schoolbus who are struck when crossing by third-party vehicles.

    For those readers who remember Jayne Mansfield, or even know who she was, this is not a story about her Hollywood exploits or bedroom acrobatics. It is a story about a common type of accident - a rear-ender involving an automobile striking a truck or bus - often referred to, in accident reconstruction circles, as "the Jayne Mansfield syndrome."

    1/31/2014 · Transportation
    I have often written about the impacts of overly-tight schedules as the primary causative factor in incidents - in fact, the underlying cause of perhaps half of them. Because speeding is one of the "cures" to this problem, one of its characteristics is the failure to slow down when the roadway surface is not, as jazz musicians say, "melody." One of the most common scenarios is to cruise over speed bumps and speed humps. Another is to fail to slow over rugged terrain, particularly potholes and the often dysfunctional patches that sloppy road crews create to "repair" them.

    12/30/2013 · Transportation
    For decades, multiple sources cited the commonly-accepted statistic that only an estimated four percent of all individuals possessed a medical condition known as Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). OSA is largely the result of certain physical characteristics and lifestyle habits that reduce the flow of oxygen into one's lungs while asleep. These characteristics result in lowered blood oxygen levels throughout one's normal night's sleep, and lower the quality of that sleep such that the individual is fatigued through much of the day.

    11/7/2013 · Transportation
    Supply and Demand: When it comes down to it, the ultimate dynamics of survival in life on Earth. More poetically, 70's pop artist icon James Taylor crooned, "You provide the satisfy, and I'll provide the need." So here we go on another jaunt to expand the scenarios for motorcoach usage. However, along the road, we are actually inventing a brand new mode - not that no one has necessarily tried this particular one before.

    10/11/2013 · Transportation
    As with every installment in this series of articles, this particular model or vision is highly unusual, has only limited application, and requires considerable creativity and effort to bring to life, and still contains some constraints even if and when one can develop it beyond the womb of an idea.

    9/24/2013 · Transportation
    There are plenty of things obvious to almost any adult, motorist or pedestrian about large vehicles. The most obvious is their size and mass. But at the other end of the spectrum lie nuances rarely understood by anyone who has not driven a vehicle with a long wheelbase: The way such a vehicle turns, and the way its tires "track" compared to those of a typical automobile, van or pickup truck.

    8/21/2013 · Transportation
    As NBT readers of my past columns well know, my perspective on accidents and their causation is pretty skewed because I spend most of my professional time examining their details.

    8/6/2013 · Transportation
    One of the most fundamental concepts of liability is that the defendant "takes the victim as he finds him." Apart from hospitals and nursing homes, few areas of modern life confront, litigate and test this principle as often as public transportation.

    7/18/2013 · Transportation
    As we all know, public transportation is a fiercely competitive business, even in operating environments which are subsidized. But the failure to make tiny investments in safety can be costly in the courtroom.

    2/26/2013 · Transportation
    Alcohol and bus ridership present a curious enigma. As a matter of public policy, we allow intoxication. As a matter of free market dynamics, we encourage it. And rightfully so, we want to protect those intoxicated from hurting themselves and others.

    12/20/2012 · Transportation
    This title makes me think immediately of funerals. This is not what this installment is about, although problems in the office and on the road often translate into funerals for operating companies, not just their accident victims.

    10/24/2012 · Transportation
    As most motorcoach community members know, contracting plays a major role in much of our operations - including the 30% of motorcoach service provided to schoolchildren on field trips, as well as the commuter-express service provided under contract to transit agencies.

    8/22/2012 · Transportation
    One would think in the Age of Irreversible and Growing Unemployment, employers could phase out their "dead wood" and find some personnel capable of performing their functions competently. Regrettably, bus agencies and companies are generally not among those which do.

    One of the unfortunate problems with non-news-oriented magazines is the juxtaposition of their readers' limited long-term memories coupled with the publishers' reluctance to repeat themes (much less whole articles) that are not linked to stories that reflect continuing news or problems.

    Recently, I conducted a workshop on safety and liability for transportation directors. I asked innocently, "What do you do after training?" Several attendees shouted out, "More training!"

    Many of our fundamental and commonly-held beliefs are invalid because they were derived, often haphazardly, from a blur of intuition, superstition, history, tradition and circumstance rarely subjected to scientific scrutiny. Before the inventions of artificial light and mechanical clocks, being awake during daylight and asleep during darkness were survival necessities - lest one be devoured by predators or stumble into a pit.

    In my review of more than 80 public transportation-related accidents and law suits, one almost universal theme has been the absence of any log review. This failure has generally combined with another common theme: A vehicle running behind schedule. The relationship between these two themes is easy to both understand and demonstrate - as is the acknowledgement that they constitute a genuine safety problem. But in a courtroom, the fact that system management failed to notice the vehicle running late - and worse, failed to even look for it - translates into a liability problem as well.

    Since driving a 20- or 25-ton motorcoach is touted as so being difficult, it is only fair to ask why so much carnage, and so many law suits, occur apart from collisions. In particular, the number of incidents occurring at or near stops seems largely disproportionate to the perceived simplicity of handling things when the bus or coach is stationary

    Check for SynapsUs
    Brent A. Johnson
    Chief Auditor
    PO Box 92462
    Southlake TX 76092
    USA
    phone: 817-230-4004
    Traction-Auditing-Experts-logo.jpg
    Brent Johnson Slip and Fall Expert PhotoBrent A. Johnson is nationally recognized in the Walkway Traction Testing Industry and the author of many articles on the application of national standards for Slip and Fall Prevention.

    Background Experience - Mr. Johnson served as a facilities manager in the healthcare industry for 12 years before moving to the Floor Safety Industry. In his experience, he has recognized the need for extensive research in the reduction of the risks contributing to slip and fall incidents. He has witnessed, first hand, the physical, mental, and financial devastation that can result from unsafe walkways, thus resulting in his proactive, rather than reactive management philosophy.

    During his tenure in the healthcare industry, Mr. Johnson has served on Environment of Care, Safety, and Emergency Management committees for a major suburban hospital network focusing on the prevention of injuries and identification of potential hazards. As a Facility Safety Officer, he has proposed and implemented solutions to minimize risks and enhance the safety for all users of a healthcare facility.

    Mr. Johnson’s experience also includes a background in education and the physical sciences which enables him to apply and articulate the physics and properties of the coefficient of friction and it’s implications with walkway surfaces and safety. His ability to apply the scientific standards for measurement of floor safety established by the National Floor Safety Institute and ANSI as part of a comprehensive walkway management program can help reduce the exposure of a facility to litigation as well as create a safer environment for employees and patrons.

    Mr. Johnson is a member of ASTM, ASSE, the ANSI B101 main committee and the chairman of the ANSI B101.0 Walkway Auditing Procedure subcommittee. He was the first Certified Walkway Auditing Safety Specialist and is now an instructor for the NFSI’s Walkway Auditor Certification Class as well as a Certified XL Tribometrist.

    Litigation Support - Brent A. Johnson specializes is Forensic Walkway Testing in slip and fall cases for both defense and plaintiff attorneys. He offers unbiased, objective walkway test data for slip and fall litigation based on the ANSI/NFSI B101 national consensus walkway testing standards. His services include the coefficient of friction (COF) measurements under both dry and wet conditions.

    View Brent Johnson's Consulting Profile.
    < 1 2 3 4 5 6 12 >